What makes a mpc "sizzle"

Discussion in 'Mouthpieces / Mutes / Other' started by trodecke, Jan 17, 2005.

  1. trodecke

    trodecke New Friend

    10
    0
    Jan 7, 2004
    Oklahoma City
    I've been playing a Schilke 13a4a for more than 20 years now and really like it. It's takes some work but I can get a decent "orchestral" sound out of it even though it's not as fat a sound as I would like. What I really like about it is the way it lets me "sizzle" in the upper register. Probably 80% of my playing now is in the upper register so having that sound is very important to me.

    Lately though I've been working on some more mainstream stuff and the Schilke just isn't cutting the mustard there. I pulled an old Purviance 10 out of a drawer, one that was given to me by a dear friend more than 20 years ago. I really like the way it opens up in the lower register and gives me that big fat sound I'm starting to like now. Unfortunately, when I go back up with it, while the upper register is there, it doesn't have the same sizzle that I can get with the Schilke no matter how hard I try. I'm sure the "sizzle" sound has something to do how focused the air stream is though I don't know for certain. I wonder if the smaller throat and tighter backbore of the Schilke is what gives me that "sizzle" sound.

    So here's my question, what makes a mpc "sizzle"?
     
  2. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

    801
    1
    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    From what I've read (and realize that I could be completely wrong on this), it's a combination of the cup and the backbore. The tighter the backbore, the brighter the sound. The shallower the cup, the brighter the sound, and also it's easier to play the high stuff. I know just what you mean about the Schilke. I'm playing on a 14A4A for my pep band and lead needs. I've found that if I use restraint and focus a little bit, I can actually produce a nice "orchestral" sound out of it. But it wasn't where I wanted it. So I now switch to a 14 for my legit stuff, and use the A4A for the pep band stuff. It really hasn't been as hard as I thought it would. My only issue currently is that when I go from the 14 to the A4A I lose some control and get kinda squirrely in the upper register. But I've only been using this combo for about 2 weeks now. Just my 2, no more like 3 cents worth.
     
  3. MUSICandCHARACTER

    MUSICandCHARACTER Forte User

    1,140
    2
    Jan 31, 2004
    Newburgh, Indiana
    I am sure it is different for every embouchure!

    But in my experience, the rim is the biggest contributor. Right behind in the cup. A sharper rim can really allow for some sizzle. A deeper cup more of a fat sound. Backbore and throat do contribute, but IMO, to a lessor degree.

    Fokus mouthpieces are interesting solution for questions like this. 4 main rim sizes and 5 different cup/backbore styles to choose from. You can get a 10.5 with a deep cup and open backbore. You can keep the backbore the same and try a different rim.

    People have come to me and said I want to move from a 7C to a 1C (not as big of jump as it sounds). I often have them try a Fokus 3 AA, then maybe a 7 AA, or 3 P. It is eye opening.

    You might look into the Fokus mouthpieces (they are a TM sponsor). You might find just the right rim/cup/backbore combo for you.

    Jim
     
  4. trodecke

    trodecke New Friend

    10
    0
    Jan 7, 2004
    Oklahoma City
    I might see if someone has a 13 or a 13B somewhere that I could use. That would definitely at least give me the same rim to work with. Thanks.
     
  5. trodecke

    trodecke New Friend

    10
    0
    Jan 7, 2004
    Oklahoma City
    I'll give them a shout, though I'm not really going on a mouthpiece safari. I've tried other mouthpieces along the way after settling on the Schilke. Invariably though I always come back to the 13a4a, sometimes after a day, others after a few minutes. I doubt my mpc drawer is as impressive as others (just 6 in there right now) which, I believe, is a testament to the Schilke. ;)
     
  6. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

    Age:
    31
    1,329
    1
    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    Have you tried the Jet-Tone Merian C? Its the only "Shallow" piece I've ever had any enjoyment playing.

    Van
     
  7. MUSICandCHARACTER

    MUSICandCHARACTER Forte User

    1,140
    2
    Jan 31, 2004
    Newburgh, Indiana
    That is another good suggestion. I have had several players mention that piece that play shallow pieces (big and deep for me!). It seems that after all the years of making "dimes with dimples" for mouthpieces that this Jet-Tone is getting some real praise.

    And they are not real expensive (a plus!).

    Jim
     
  8. trodecke

    trodecke New Friend

    10
    0
    Jan 7, 2004
    Oklahoma City
    Eck! I "experimented with a JT back in High School and while it was fun for a couple of days (coming from a Bach 10 1/2 C) it took me nearly a month to get any kind of tonal quality back into my sound when I switched back to the Bach. That's when my band director gave me his Schilke 13a4a..

    I suppose it's possible they've improved their quality since then but I do believe I'll be staying away from the JTs a while longer. :)
     
  9. trodecke

    trodecke New Friend

    10
    0
    Jan 7, 2004
    Oklahoma City
    <hehe> Well, I can get one to sizzle so I know I got it in me somewhere. ;)
     
  10. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

    801
    1
    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    You have to realize that Van's Jet Tone is probably radically different from what yours was. I tried the MF. HA! Band director who played in the local jazz band told me to use it as a paper weight and to go out and buy myself a real mouthpiece.
     

Share This Page