What makes a trumpet better than another?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Hitman0042, Sep 27, 2008.

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  1. Hitman0042

    Hitman0042 Banned

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    that is awesome. I wish i met him. But that guy doesn't come to Australia.

    Up yer thank for the advice. Do any of you guys think you can play like him or any other trumpet players? I mean some of you guys have been playing for more than 10 or even 20 years now?
     
  2. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Just a thought on this: I recognise some of the sentiment expressed here, but I have to say than one of the major things I paid for when I commenced as a comeback player was an intelligent presentation of musical theory - yes I'd bought the books, and read them cover to cover, and it helped a bit, but I don't learn that way. Some of us learn by seeing, some by touching, some by hearing. Most of us need a combination of all of these. I have spent a number of my lessons doing exactly as Hitman describes in his lessons - remember Hitman has come with what appears to be a low knowledge base (not his fault) - I cameback from 37 years away from reading and translating written score into a tune and was effectively a newbie again. I found this process difficult because I had simply forgotten EVERYTHING I had ever been taught about musical notation, timing, tone, and for that matter how to bring it all together. I have thought about Hitman's problem/progression and I think that we may be pushing him where WE would like him to be rather than objectively assessing his abilities first hand, and actually knowing where he is CAPABLE of being NOW. His tutor has that privelage first hand and we have all assumed that he has not taken Hitman's physical and psychological development on board. If we all go back and read some of the earlier posts we could be accused of being very dismissive of an experienced musician and his skill level both in making music and in passing on his knowledge to young Hitman - think about the 'arrogance' of that assumption. As an educator, I would be seriously annoyed that anyone had taken such a highhanded assumption about my skill level.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2008
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hitman,
    trying to imitate somebody is a great thing to do the first couple of years that you are playing. That role model can give us a lot of drive to keep practicing and get better. My idols for the first 5 years of my playing were my trumpet teacher, Armondo Ghitalla, Herb Alpert, Rafael Mendez, Al Hirt and Maurice André. The orchestral players came into play when I started to study and during my Army Band gig.

    Once a certain degree of proficiency has been reached, most players establish their own thing. That is a much higher goal - to be a model for others instead of a copycat.
    We all have different experiences and the true musician can paint" those experiences in their playing!
     
  4. Hitman0042

    Hitman0042 Banned

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    that is what im saying ROFL
     
  5. Gary Schutza

    Gary Schutza Pianissimo User

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    I know you want to sound like Chris Botti, he's a fine player. There is perhaps one thing you should know. We played a concert with him 2 weeks ago (he was the guest artist on our pops series) and we all noticed that he uses a mike on his bell, about an inch away. At one point in the show his mike died and we totally lost him. He had to go over to one of the vocals mikes to be heard. I'm absolutely not trying to say he isn't a great player, just that it is perhaps unrealistic to try and match his sound. He is playing no more than about a mezzo-piano at all times. It totally works for him in his circumstances. Are your circumstances just like his? Can you get away with playing that softly at all times? When he opens up the volume his sound changes, so he has learned that to get the sound he wants he has to have amplification at all times. Can you have amplification on your horn at all times? Probably not. Just something to think about. And again, I'm not trying to say anything negative against Chriss Boti. He played well and was a gentleman. We can't always say that about our guest artists.

    chip
     
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  6. Hitman0042

    Hitman0042 Banned

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    well mic or no mic. He still gets the proper sound out of his trumpet and plays beautifully. Just because he doesn't have the power to be heard without a mic doesn't mean his bad or anything. It i hard to get a loud noise from the trumpet. But he is the one that plays nice and all that and that's not what matters. Do you think you can play really loud so everyone can hear or would you need a mic?
     
  7. Pete

    Pete Piano User

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    I'm just curious. how old are you?

    Pete
     
  8. Hitman0042

    Hitman0042 Banned

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    i am 16, why?
     
  9. Pete

    Pete Piano User

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    Again. I was just curious. Don't take offense.

    Pete
     
  10. Hitman0042

    Hitman0042 Banned

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    nah i don't really care.

    How long have you been playing the trumpet for?
     
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