What makes a trumpet better than another?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Hitman0042, Sep 27, 2008.

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  1. Puukka

    Puukka Pianissimo User

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    First you´d need a develeoped embouchure, that´s why your trumpet might be good enough for these days. Then, your embouchure shouldn´t be in a bad state, it happens sometimes with me testing trumpets for days and the embouchure gets weak, Than I can say nothing about the horn anymore.
    The more you know about the technical differences the better you might be able to go a logical way, even there can be a lot of surprises, you would have never guessed by theory.

    Mostly you select a trumpet because you are not completely satisfied with a parameter of your "old" one.
    So....I´d like to get a brighter sound (going lightweight?, ML bore instead of L bore? tighter bell than the wide one?)
    I´d like to get a fuller/darker sound (wider bell than the tight one?, wider bore?)
    I´d like to get a more open blow (going lightweight, wider bore or bell?, wider leadpipe?)
    I´d like to get a more centered sound (going regular weight?, tighter bore or bell?)
    a.s.o.

    You also only could take one horn and try it out, without thinking of the specs.
    You like it overall the others because whatever reason? Take it, no matter what is has engraved at the bell.

    By the way, if you are satisfied with Chinese horns and dream about buying a Bach as you further stated, why not a Bach made in China like the TR 500 ;o)
    No joke, some twenty years ago a Leica camera made in Gemany was "much better" than a japanese one. Today most of the Leica cameras are made in Japan and as example the Nikons in Thailand. No one complains anymore.
    Herbert
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2008
  2. Hitman0042

    Hitman0042 Banned

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    well yer but i want an American made one next time.
     
  3. lmf

    lmf Forte User

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    Hitman,

    That certainly would be a good way to start, if the mouthpiece is a good one to start with. Being a new player, you probably wouldn't be on a mouthpiece safari yet as you need to build your embrochure.

    Best wishes,

    Lloyd
     
  4. lmf

    lmf Forte User

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    Hitman,

    American-made instruments are good, but don't forget manufacturers from other parts of the world are good, too. There may be those that are easier and cheaper to obtain in your country. Try to read reviews from those in your country that musicians there use. Those of us in the USA realize that American trumpets and cornets are expensive in your country. Don't forget that there are many used American trumpets and cornet (along with quality horns from other countries) that far surpass the Chinese instrument you are starting with. But, play your instrument as long as you can until you learn more. Eventually, you will begin to see what you are looking for in your next trumpet. Do remember what people on the forum have said? "Try each horn first - even those in the same brand." It is usually better if you "play before you pay."

    Best wishes,

    Lloyd
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    There are mechanical traits that make some instruments higher quality that others, but is that better? I think not. The same applies to the sonics.

    My take:
    a quality student horn is built to take a beating and still work. It is easy to play and is well in tune. The sound is not "bright" or "dark". Being built tough, it will sacrifice projection (not really an issue for an underdeveloped embouchure) and a big palette of colors.

    A quality pro horn will be all over the map - different brands and characteristics appealing to different players. The mechanical quality is no better than the fine student instrument, but durability is sacrificed to optimize sound and projection. The horns are built light, heavy, dark and light sounding, some with more resistance, some with less. It is a fact that many pro horns have intonation problems - making them more difficult to play.

    So the bottom line is that you need the right horn for the job that you are doing. A Bach pro horn for a beginner is NOT the right recipe, just as a Getzen student horn is not the optimal symphonic instrument.

    Finally, a cheap horn is exactly that. In my opinion only in existance to earn money for the factory and shop selling it. It is not offered as a "quality" option to the customer. If the shops that sold them played EVERY SINGLE ONE and made the necessary adjustments BEFORE the customer got them, it would be a viable option BUT time is money, and that process would raise the price so much that a decent horn would then be competitive.

    Research makes a good horn findable. Take your time, play everything that you can get your hands on and keep in mind that your SECOND trumpet should have at least a years worth of research before purchase. Then you probably know what you are talking about and asking for!
     
  6. mrmusicnotes

    mrmusicnotes Piano User

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    I am a union plumber by trade and in my early years in the trade if any materials arrived on the job site that was stamped made in India,Pakistan,China etc. they were quickly sent back or thrown out!Today,with the way the world is today,its a completely different story.I have to work with Brass and copper fittings from these countries and they are truly CRAP!There cast iron fittings are garbage,full of casting imperfections,brittle compounds that crumble when cut. If you want quality plumbing materials as well as quality trumpets,you have to pay for the work and time that goes into a craftsman work of art.
     
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  7. Puukka

    Puukka Pianissimo User

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    Krems an der Donau
    Hmm, I have to confess, I think the same.

    Regarding trumpets I´m nostalgic.
    In the 70ties and 80ties here in Austria "Jazz trumpets" were only fine, if they were "Made in U.S.A." the country of Jazz. Teacher were bringing trumpets for their students from their oversea trip.

    I´m also aware that as example Yamaha and Jupiter might present overall a better craftmanship, but still....Stupid but for me it´s O.K.
    Herbert
     
  8. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    In OZ it might be easier to t try Yamaha and Jupiter, both making fine instruments. If you want to be sure to get a US made trumpet, Getzen and Kanstul are built from scratch in US factories. There are small companies who use parts made by Getzen and Kanstul: Lawler, Flip Oaks, Scodwell, etc.
     
  9. Hitman0042

    Hitman0042 Banned

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    Australia
    yer well i dont think im going to spend a year on research on 1 trumpet. I mean seriously a YEAR!!! But i know i want a American made instrument. Its just what i want because i like it. It will be hard cause i live in Australia so there will be more Asian made ones than American ones. Thats why i was thinking ebay. What you reckon? ebay good?
     
  10. lmf

    lmf Forte User

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    Hitman,

    "What you reckon? ebay good?"

    Only if you know what you are looking for? How will you know it is the trumpet for you?

    The "one year" guideline is a good one!

    Best wishes,

    Lloyd
     
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