what makes a trumpet pro or student grade

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by mtlcaqc, Dec 29, 2009.

  1. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    All good advice here. One other horn I'd toss out that mimics a pro horn within the entry price range is is the Darby, designed by Mr. Darby of Capitol Music in Montgomery AL. I understand he also designed the TR-300 for Bach. At any rate, the Darby is a close copy of a Bach Strad for much, much, much less. I played one (actually at the competing music shop for Darby) when trying out a few new Bach Strads. I was really amazed at the horn. Capitol Music USA - Quality Instruments and Service Since 1955
     
  2. gglassmeyer

    gglassmeyer Piano User

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    one other question I think you're asking is about the student horn getting better over time. I think what may have you confused is that older student horns manufactured over 40 years ago were generally higher quality horns from the start. Manufacturers started cutting costs and making compromises so the newer student trumpets were inferior to their older siblings. So older student horns are better simply because more care, craftsmanship and higher standards went into their production, not because they improved over time.

    If you're pretty sure you'll continue playing trumpet, I'd enlist the help of a friend or teacher to seek out a decent used professional horn.

    Student horns are also in more danger of being dropped and damaged because they're in the hands of young children. You generally don't want to hand a child a decent pro horn. They're going to put dings in it or drop it at some point in time. More mature players are more careful and respectful of a fine horn and will treat it kindly.
     
  3. jbkirby

    jbkirby Forte User

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    Just weighing in on recommendations for older horns: I own both a Conn Director and an Olds Ambassador both of the same mid-sixties vintage, and both are very good horns, but I give the Olds a clear edge in a side-to-side comparison (among other advantages, valves are much faster). I paid 58 bucks for the Olds, and 18 bucks for the Conn. Either way, IMHO, you cannot go wrong. :thumbsup:
     
  4. mtlcaqc

    mtlcaqc New Friend

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    wow, thanks every one, I read each reply with attention, I see there is a lots of good recommendation for a used vintage trumpet. actually, I played trumpet for about 2 years on a jupiter tr-300 that I bought brand new for 3xx$ at that time, last week when I went to steve music store to get new trumpet oil, I had the chance to try on 3 different trumpet, a bach stradivarius 37 2099$, a stradivarius 37 reversed version 2399$ and a stradivarius c trumpet 2599$, because I didn't bring my jupiter with me, so I could not compare mine with the tone of these pro grade horn, but any how my experience for these pro grade trumpet was so so, the reversed one has a tone more bass, the regular 37 sounds like my student tr-300, (I didn't realize a big improvement for tone) the c trumpet has a pitch totally different, that's it. during passed 2 years, I did only technical practice with my jupiter and didn't pay so much attention on a trumpet's characteristic, I don't have knowledge on a trumpet, I don't understand why the price rang of those trumpets are so different, what makes them expensive, the sales man told me the materials used are better quality for a pro trumpet, but any how I found they sounds all the same or almost all the same. after he heard my playing, he suggested that I could change my trumpet for a better one, that's why I had the chance to try on those pro line trumpet and since then I started to learn the trumpet. until today I don't have enough motivation to pay out 2 or 3 thousands $ to get a pro line horn for a so called better sound, but this story gives me an idea to try any other trumpet to see. I know I have almost 0 knowledge on trumpet, that's why I opened this tropic on the forums to ask the expert here. that's it my story, all suggestions are welcome, I read each of your reply, thank you every one to take time to teach me, I appreciate all your feedback, thank you!!!
     
  5. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Please note that you do NOT likely want a C trumpet. They are more of a specialty music horn. When people talk about trumpets, they are talking about the Bb -unless otherwise specified. 99.9% of all music is written for the Bb -not the C.
     
  6. Buck with a Bach

    Buck with a Bach Fortissimo User

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    The C's are mostly orchestral instruments, but can come in handy in a church setting where you end up seconding piano or organ out of hymnals. No transposition!.............Buck:play::oops:
     
  7. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    You're right, but every trumpet player should learn to transpose from piano music to Bb trumpet, in my opinion. It's something I teach all my trumpet (and clarinet) students once they reach a certain level of competence and musical maturity.

    One piece of advice to mtlcaqc -- it's important when you try out different trumpets that you use your own current mouthpiece. And play the same music exactly on each instrument you try. That way the only thing which changes is the trumpet itself and you're much better able to compare them to each other. You can experiment with the included mouthpieces after you've done a basic comparison, but be very scientific in your comparisons and have a trumpet-playing friend with you. If you're trying a lot of instruments, bring a notebook and jot down your impressions of each instruments along with the serial numbers so that if you decide to buy one, you can be certain you're buying the exact one you tried and liked. Two different instruments with the exact same specifications can play quite differently so don't just assume that you can randomly buy another trumpet of the same make/model/configuration and be happy with it.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The player behind it makes it pro or student.

    Pro horns can be actually tougher to play if you don't have your chops together. Quality student horns are easy to play and built to take punishment from players without much knowledge. A pro horn is much more sensitive.

    Up to a point, more expensive horns will allow well practiced players louder louds, softer softs and a more vibrant sound. It will allow more synergy with the body and let more of what is in the players brain out. A pro horn can destroy a poor players chops.
     
  9. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    That sums it up -- all the rest is just marketing hype and price-list positioning.
    Put a Bundy in Jon Faddis's hands and he'll still sound great, put Faddis's horn in the hands of the 2-week beginner whose Bundy it was, and that student will still sound like a 2-week beginner.
     
  10. soundgrazer

    soundgrazer Pianissimo User

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    To my dismay, I have noticed that recent student trumpets are not as good as the older student trumpets (that makes me sound old.) Yamaha is a good example of this. A student Yamaha from the seventies was made more precisely than their recent ones built in China. But I think Jupiter and Bach is putting out some great student horns.

    I don't think it matters too much what kind of student horn you buy. the real challenge is picking a mouthpiece. For the question of pro horns I would say that at one point equipment does matter and WILL hold you back if it is not right for you. But play the student horn for 5 years first.
     

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