What makes you fall in love with a horn?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Stradbrother, Sep 2, 2015.

  1. Stradbrother

    Stradbrother Pianissimo User

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    Hey guys, I just wanted your opinion on something.

    When it comes to trying new horns and really falling in love with one, what is it that makes you fall in love with it?

    For example, I played on a strike Strad for the longest time and it was killing me. It was a real clunky horn with a stuffy upper register. I would play on other Strads and be so jealous of how easily they played.

    About three years ago I came across a custom set of Getzens. I tried a bunch of them, but one that stuck out to me with a rose brass reverse leadpipe 3051. What made me fall in love was the slotting. This thing had a real dark rich sound thanks to the construction, but the slotting was crazy good. I could slide all around the horn without any flub between notes without putting much effort into it.

    That day I sold my Strad and bought the horn right there and it's been my baby ever since.

    What is it that made you guys fall in love with a horn you have played?
     
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  2. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    When the horn demands to be played, and you can't put it down
     
  3. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    The sounds that come out of it. Everything else is secondary.
     
  4. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Yeah, what he said. It's a joy to hold, a joy to play, and you're playing the horn... the horn isn't playing you.

    Tom

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I find the three major parameters to look for are sound, response and intonation, and a lot of horns are pretty good at only two out of the three. Most of my horns are pretty good at all three, and these are a joy to play.
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I so disagree with that. If that was the case, I'd never have looked for something other than my Schilke B6 for the party band - the sound on that horn is nigh perfect for that gig, but the slotting was killing me.

    Enter the Jupiter 1600i Roger Ingram model trumpet. People are probably getting tired of hearing me rave about this trumpet, but it's flat out a fantastic trumpet. It responds well, has an even blow with balanced resistance bottom to top, has a great sound that is easy to color and alter, either with the sound concept in your head, or with an appropriate mouthpiece, and the slotting is to die for. The difference it has made in my playing in just the short time I've been using it is nothing short of profound.
     
  7. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    No, I don't think you do, Patrick. Unless you're saying that you will accept an inferior sound for the sake of better playability.
     
  8. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Intonation, sound, ease of play, looks/ergonomics, in that order.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Sound is going to mainly come from me provided that the horn isn't otherwise a dog. The Jupiter is different than the Schilke - not really better, not really worse, just different. The Jupiter definitely has a thicker core, which makes it overall more versatile, but the Schilke had a certain "icing on the cake" quality to it that's hard to describe - I really liked it, but the slotting was so squirrely for me that something had to change because I was driving myself crazing in the practice room trying to lock in with a horn that just doesn't want to lock in tight where slotting is concerned. I don't think it's just me either, and I think that for two reasons - one, I've heard similar comments from other people about the Schilke. If you've got the chops to deal with it (Chuck Willard, for example is pretty danged good with his B6) it's one thing, but for me it would bite me if my chops weren't right on the money all the time. Two, the accuracy difference I've experienced with the Jupiter in just the 3 weeks I've had it is amazing - it's like I all of a sudden became a much better player, seemingly overnight.

    In any case, sound differences aside, at this point I can't go back to my Schilke B6.
     
  10. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    I was told by someone I trust that too much emphasis is put on sound without realizing that other factors, such as articulation, are important too. If you don't have facility on the horn, the best sound ever won't do you any good.

    So, while the best players can probably deal with the other issues in search of sound, a lot of us need to pay more attention to all aspects of the horn, not just the sound itself.

    Tom
     

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