what muscles do you believe you use while playing in your higher register?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by daniel117, Nov 7, 2012.

  1. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I must admit Rapier although I will speak of using the diaphragm I thought that we can only have an effect on it by using abdominal muscles not actually make it work directly but I'm sure that Gman has read his Grey's a few times and will explain further. Like you I am interested in this because support plays such a big part in my thinking when I am playing (as I've said before I think that has a lot to do with my having lot of singing lessons and singing operatic tenor toles)
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2012
  2. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    Yes Andy, my understanding is that when the diaphragm contracts it is to enlarge the cavity to draw air in. It relaxes as we breathe out so can't be much use in blowing, I'd have thought. I await the good Doctor's response with baited breathe (not using my diaphragm ).
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    The neural control of breathing post I made below the article explains this in the summary button. Do clinck on that button if you have yet to already review that part of the link.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I can do this if you would like, but I really believe the last button of the second link states this so clearly without a lot of technical mumbo jumbo.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I believe you understand this oh so well, and have your finger on this topic.
     
  6. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    Can't get it to open. But answer me this , good Doc. Even if we can control it, it relaxes when exhaling so if that is the case(?), it plays no part in the forced exhalation used to play. Or maybe I misunderstand?

    Thanks.
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    let me give this a whirl -- since I read my Grey's anatomy book (ok, like over 25 years ago ROFL ROFL ROFL) --- it's like a big rubber band -- the more you stretch it, the harder it snaps back. Therefore consciously you can contract the diapragm muscle more, it will have more power when it relaxes, and using that in conjunction with your abdominal muscles to reduce the cavity size of your body (uhm using those adbominals to essentially push your guts up a little bit and help to firm up the mid-section which essentially "pushes" everything, compressing your guts against your lung cavity (just a little anyhow) including the air, and making the force of air(or the speed, or the volume - depending on your philosophy on that) JUST a little bit better!!!!!
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    The diaphram specificaly plays no ACTIVE role in forced exhalation, so your concept specific as it relates, isolated to diaphram dynamics is correct. Ordinarily, expiration is an entirely passive process. The elastic structures of the lung, chest cage, and abdomen as well as the tone of the abdominal muscles, force the diaphragm upward once the diaphram relaxes, again, as you correctly noted. However, if forceful expiration is required, the diaphragm can also be pushed upward powerfully by active contraction of the abdominal muscles against the abdominal contents. In this way, all the abdominal muscles combined together represents the major muscles of expiration. And with the size of my abdomine, man can I blow a lot of hot air!!!
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Not bad KT. This kind of relates to the elastic recoil event that I relate in the post above. You have learned much regarding medicine here on TM, young grasshopper.
     
  10. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I love it when my peers love me back, and acknowledge my high intellectual capacity for learning and educating others!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL

    ps. just got off the phone with my good buddy, GM ole pal!!! don't you all wish, you were as important as me?? being able to call up one of the greatest modern jazz trumpet players alive and being his BFF!! ----------------now that's very cool!!!
     

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