what muscles do you believe you use while playing in your higher register?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by daniel117, Nov 7, 2012.

  1. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I think that was the ## sharps hit the fan --- because earlier we discussed tightening the sphincter muscles and all the other lower body, which I think would inherently LIMIT the possibility of excreting certain solid bodied waste products ---- but just in case, keep the fan on LOW, and pointed at the Saxophone players!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  2. sounds7

    sounds7 Forte User

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    Wheres the cool medical picture of Ass Cheeks?
     
  3. wilktone

    wilktone New Friend

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    Asking players which muscles they *think* they use is probably not going to be a very reliable method to determine which muscles are actually used. Muscular effort is a subjective thing. The stronger your muscles are the less work it feels like to use them. An advanced player with a very well developed embouchure might feel the work load is taken up more in the breathing than the embouchure, for example.

    There have been some well designed studies using electrodes and in fared thermography that take a more objective look at which muscles are used in playing brass instruments. Of particular interest to this topic would be Visualization of Trumpet Player's Warmup Through Infrared Thermography. The abstract states:

    Comparing your highlighted areas with what the infrared study determined shows much similarity, although you appear to feel that the m. buccinator (cheeks) is more engaged than seems to be typical of the experienced trumpet players studied. This could be because you haven't yet developed the other muscles yet enough, are targeting your effort in an inefficient manner, or simply are mistaken about where you're doing the bulk of the embouchure work.

    Dr. Matthias Bertsch, one of the authors of this above study, has also been using similar techniques to study how muscles in the torso (e.g., breathing muscles) are used when playing. You can see some of these videos on his YouTube channel. It may be worth considering that Arnold Jacobs, who during his life was considered to be an authority on respiration in general and breathing for musicians in particular, noted that there are internal mechanisms that restrict internal air pressure (if I recall correctly it was something like 3 pounds per square inch, I'm too lazy to go find the relevant book right now). He also took a look at the actual air pressure inside the aural cavity to play particular pitches on the different brass instruments and determined that a lot of the muscular effort that brass players end up using to support may be wasted effort, it really doesn't take that much to support well. Take this with a grain of salt, though, because I'm going by my memory. If I have the time later I will try to find where I read this, but if anyone has the various books about Jacobs you may find it in one of them somewhere.

    Dave
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    You can use what ever muscle you like, and will likely have to adapt lip muscles to tighten the embouchure for more vibration BUT NOT FORCE. To support the high note, tensing abdominal muscles that puts pressure on the upper abdomen is the way to go. Also just before entering the higher register phrase, use the shoulder muscles to lift the apical chest wall that will increase the volume of air in the lung to add additional support.

    As for medical ass cheeks, I have many photos of these... but professionally we call them gluteus photos. Either way you call them, the photos are still cool. Always did love studying that part of the anatomy in medical school... and the refresher courses thereafter, nearly every day... Refreshing!
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I believe my source was a little more revealing, but as they say in the business, I will just turn the other cheek.
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I think we all underestimate the role of the right hand little finger....
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    now you brought up a whole new situation ----- in that does the pinky finger go in the ring, or not??? ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Depends on how high you need to go!!
     
  10. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    uhm, I thought we came to that conclusion already ----- stand on an Arban's Method book, and you will play higher, and that is the purpose of that book!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     

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