what song did you have to master?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by songbook, Jan 7, 2014.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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  2. Jfrancis

    Jfrancis Pianissimo User

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    Reiche's Ablasson Fanfare (CBS Sunday Morning). Piccolo trumpet, my senior year in high school.
     
  3. trumpetdiva1

    trumpetdiva1 Piano User

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    In my case, it was Tom Kubis' arrangement of "Caravan" performed by my friend George Graham's big band with Wayne Bergeron on lead. I played the lead trumpet part that George sent to me. One page of the chart seemed difficult and I had to practice it daily so that I could perform it for the gig with the jazz orchestra. Buddy Rich's "Channel One Suite" was another chart. Range and endurance had to really be there.

    Another piece for me is the Michael Haydn "Concerto for Trumpet in D Major" on piccolo trumpet. I played it for my graduate recital (received standing ovation), and as a masterclass participant for Charles Daval, and in a lesson with Susan Slaughter. I am currently revisiting this piece for an upcoming performance at church.

    Janell
     
  4. songbook

    songbook Piano User

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    Again, I can't thank you enough for your feed back. My hats off to all of you great and dedicated musicians. Some of you have mentioned playing both jazz and classical. Did you have to have a different mind set for each one? Also, were there any famous classical trumpet players who ventured into playing jazz?
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Perhaps... most of the jazz I play I do from the C part, so I have to have a transposition mind set here.

    I also when playing jazz try to keep a mind set as to the lyrics behind the notes I am playing. I try to read from the lyrics more than from the notes to give it the feeling, emotion and flavor of the reason for the tune. Playing lyrics tends to put me more "in tune" with the emotion than when I play songs (typically classical) that has no lyrics. This is a BIG mind set change as I have to read notes and lyrics (read or think) at the same time... all the while I am transposing.

    I do try to read more off the dynamics when playing classical, I guess because I have no lyrics to go by.

    A BIG mindset difference I have when playing classical is that I am usually a part of an orchestra, where I see the conductor as the real instrument, not my trumpet. So in classical I try to play more for the conductor, while in jazz I play more for me.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Wynton comes to mind.
     
  7. songbook

    songbook Piano User

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    gmonady, what a great explanation. In classical you play for the conductor, and in jazz you play for yourself. Great answer. It helped me define the difference.
     
  8. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    This is not strictly true. Peter Bassano on the late, great Maurice Murphy

     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    My mindset when playing Classical music is that I try to play for the composer, and that the conductor (doing the same) and I can come to some consensus.
    Put another way, if I play just for the conductor it means I need to be spoon-fed. By playing for the composer I've made it through rehearsals without a single word directed towards the trumpets.
     
  10. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi songbook,
    You asked:
    "Some of you have mentioned playing both jazz and classical. Did you have to have a different mind set for each one?
    ----------------------
    For me? Yes. I found out early that doing Queen of the Night ala MF didn't make my trumpet teacher very happy. He then recorded it and made me listen. This made me very unhappy. There's a different touch that needs (or at least be adhered to) be addressed. Heck, there's different approaches to Romantic, Baroque, Classical, Modernist, etc..
    I guess the way I think of it is:
    With classical: "What was Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Copland, Bernstein, trying to convey and play it in the style of that time."
    With jazz: "What was Louis, Henderson, Dizzy, MF, trying to convey and play it in the style of that time."
    -----
    As for "did and famous classical trumpet players venture ito jazz? I think most of us cut our teeth on classical and the term jazz (just like classical) is very vague. Possibly the two that readily come to mind are Rafael Mendez who did a lot of popluar tunes for television and radio and Doc Severensen who would go from the Tonight Show to Boson Pops.
    Possibly the biggest group to be steeped in both genres are pianists and composers.
    Hope this helps
    Dr.Mark
     

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