What to do when lips are so sour they wont buzz

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by frankmike, Sep 29, 2009.

  1. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    What to do when your lips are so sour that they wont buzz

    On saturday I had 3 hours of rehersal and 1 hour performance and than again when I got home I played a little more about half an hour

    than on sunday I was resting didnt even touch trumpet, because my chops were in pain and lips swallen

    on monday I went practicing but first half an hour or so my tone would occasionaly dissapear as lips stopped buzzing. I had hard time playing soft and quiet tones. Than after half an hour things got better as chops warmed up and lips got more blood flowing but still I had problems when going from low to high and vice versa

    What do you reccoment for better and quicker healing of the lips.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2009
  2. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Frank,

    If the your lips don't buzz probably you pressed too much for too long or had an extremely difficult rehearsal. It is not normal to get there only after 3 hours of playing.
     
  3. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    OMG, when I browsed for my problem I came across tih article. For sure it is exaggerated, it has to be. I mean is it really true that we could end up with all those problems


    Medical problems of brass instrumentalists: prevalence rates for trumpet, trombone, French horn, and low brass | Medical Problems of Performing Artists | Find Articles at BNET

    QUOTE:
    Performing a brass instrument requires physical demands to hold and position the instrument, press the mouthpiece against the lips, produce and sustain blowing pressure, and either press valves and/or pull and push slides. It is assumed that these physical demands may contribute to performance-related medical problems. For instance, studies suggest that blowing pressure during brass performance may cause increases in intraocular pressure and glaucomatous damage, (1) respiratory problems, (2) cardiac arrhythmias, (3) and orofacial dysfunction. (4) Injury to the orbicularis oris muscle (5) and other embouchure problems including lip pain and limited flexibility, (6) as well as tooth displacement, (7) are related to mouthpiece forces against the lips. Additionally, medical problems linked to brass performance have included dermatitis, 8 hand and wrist problems, (9,10) and overuse syndromes. (11-13)

    For trumpet players, intraoral pressures, measured as high as 25 kPa, (14) may lead to neck abscesses due to microperforation of the anterior pharynx, (15) laryngoceles, (16) pharyngeal diverticula, (17) spontaneous epidural hematomas, (18) transient ischemic attacks, (19) and visual field defects associated with increased intraocular pressure. (1) The compressive forces against the lips, at times greater than 100 N, (7,20) are substantial enough to alter tooth position up to 100 [micro]m (7) and cause serious injury of the orbicularis oris muscle. (5)
     
  4. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I have a problem with this article...it doesn't say what kind of players were tested (professional, amateur or else), when these intraoral pressures, measured as high as 25 kPa are exceed...When compressive forces against the lips exceed 100N etc...Not long ago we had this discussion here on TM...There is always a risk for substantial muscle damage when an excessive pressure to lips is applied...that's why we need to attend lessons and learn how to play without excessive mp pressure...Once the damage is done, very little can be done to reverse/heal it.
     
  5. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Frankmike, I suspect your problem is not quite as serious as the article might suggest (but, only your doctor can say for sure...). The most common problem is that the continuous vibration and pressure on the lips causes the lips to swell up temporarily - not unlike swelling in a joint that has been stressed. It simply takes rest to overcome it. Also, try sucking on some ice or a popcicle or anything cold. In addition, an NSAID medication (Naproxin, Ibuprofin, etc.) can help to reduce the swelling as long as you don't overdo it.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I recommend taking a glass of tap water when you practice. If the lips stop buzzing, take a sip and let the water cool the lips. Swelling goes down, sound comes back.

    Even if my playing schedule is not heavy, I have my water in the practice room. It is a habit that costs nothing, has benefits and cannot hurt anything.
     
  7. Kaalima

    Kaalima New Friend

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    Hello, I'm new here and I just thought I'd say hi.
     
  8. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Your introduction won't be noticed being buried deep in someone else's thread. It would be much better to go to the "Introductions and Greetings" section and start your own thread there. You just go to the "Forum Tools" tab in the task bar at the top of the thread pane and you will see "Post a New Thread" that you can use to start one. Give us some background about yourself, too.
     
  9. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    false alarm guys

    I realised that I was actually exposed to wind on sunday (the day when I didnt even touch trumpet)

    now its ok, actually its perfect, chops are back in their normal state.

    And adding a bit of moist to my lips with my tongue helped a lot, also glass of water is fine advice

    thnx bye
     
  10. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Get some lemons...
     

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