What to study for speed

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Msen, Nov 3, 2015.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,793
    3,560
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    All of them.

    Actually, if you can successfully and cleanly rip through the 1st and 2nd studies from Clarke's technical studies, that would take you a long way.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,962
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    I believe that speed is a function of quantity of patterns learned. By learned, I mean hundreds to thousands of accurate repetitions. I used the Coker Patterns for Jazz, the St. Jacome velocity studies as well as Clarke technical studies to perfect patterns for a variety of genres. These are also what I teach and have brought the most success over a great cross section of players.

    You practice these things VERY softly and get multiple benefits.
     
  3. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

    3,502
    2,306
    Oct 22, 2008
    Maryland
    You have to practice patterns? Are you sure? (Just kidding. Jerry Coker's book is my favorite for practicing patterns. It's a part of my daily practice routine.)

    Lots of good advice by everyone.

    Mike
     
  4. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

    3,936
    1,830
    Jan 21, 2010
    Great Southern Land
    Do you or anybody else know how that book compares to Eric Bolvin's Modern Jazz Trumpet Method book? I use Mr Bolvin's one for the many many patterns.
    The Modern Jazz Trumpet Method - Bolvin Music Studios - Faded Duck Publications, Trumpet & Brass Lessons & more...

    --bumblebee
     
  5. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

    3,502
    2,306
    Oct 22, 2008
    Maryland
    They are both great books. I have both of them. Here's my comparison of them (IMHO).

    Eric's book might be viewed as easier for people starting out, since every pattern is written out in every key. In addition, it is organized by the type of pattern (eg, arpeggios), and maybe has less overall content.

    Jerry Coker's book doesn't write out the patterns in all keys. In addition, it is organized by harmonic structure (eg, major patterns), and probably has more content.

    Disclaimer 1 - Even though Eric's book might have less content, that probably doesn't matter much. Any pattern book is only a starting point, which you can use to create additional patterns on your own.

    Disclaimer 2 - I don't mind that Coker doesn't write everything out. I work from memory when practicing patterns. (You can't have a pattern book open when soloing. :cool:)

    Both books are kind to trumpet players when it comes to high notes, with most patterns written in a comfortable playing range.

    Also, for Aebersold fans, Jerry Coker's approach is used a lot in Jamey Aebersold's play-alongs and Jazz Handbook.

    Mike
     
  6. trumpetdiva1

    trumpetdiva1 Piano User

    271
    30
    Jun 6, 2004
    Albuquerque
    In addition to these books, I would add Robert Nagel's "Speed Studies."

    I’d practice half the Clarke book one day and the other half the next day.

    Janell

    ----
    Janell Carter : Trumpet Corner
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,962
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    I don't personally think that the "method" is the deciding factor. Our brains work by storing patterns for recall. The important part is not the quantity, rather the precision of the patterns of movement. If we repeat a pattern say 200 times at a medium to slow speed, we can play it MUCH faster than we practiced it.
     
  8. Franklin D

    Franklin D Forte User

    1,715
    984
    May 23, 2009
    The Netherlands
  9. Msen

    Msen Piano User

    362
    134
    Dec 28, 2011
    I live in the Horn

    I was just about to post that I decided to practice pentatonic, diminished and niavent scales increasing the bpms on the metronome.

    Thanks for all the input though
     
  10. richtom

    richtom Forte User

    Age:
    67
    1,538
    1,273
    Dec 7, 2003
    Thank you, Franklin D!
    In all keys and modes and don't forget chromatic scales. Start slowly until you master them.
    Increase to 2 octave scales and it will help your range,too.
    Rich T.
     

Share This Page