What's happening to me?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Clarion, Oct 5, 2010.

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  1. Clarion

    Clarion New Friend

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    Oct 3, 2010
    N.E. Ohio
    Thanks Dale. I have had my suspicions about the horn. There may be a reason it was given to me after being used as a Christmas gag gift.

    I often hear a gurggling sound even though I keep the water valves drained. I also recently replaced the corks on the water valves. I have a feeling the third valve leaks a bit as I've been finding a surprising amount of fluid in the bottom cap after playing for a while. I'll have to pull out my el cheapo flugelhorn to see if it improves my sound any.

    The more I read here the more I wonder if I've bitten off more than I can chew. Even though I once played for eight years and could blast out a high C, I wonder if I really could have been considered a real brass player. I certainly never had the guidance or the discipline to properly develop my playing skills as many of you have.
     
  2. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Just keep plugging at it - if it was easy, everyone would play trumpet! :D

    I played about 10 years before sliding my trumpet under the bed for about 7 years. I wasn't very good back then, but after picking it up again for these many years, I'm light years ahead of where I was back then (no private lessons, either...).

    Being off as long as you were, you're basically developing your lip from scratch again. You do have the advantage of having some trumpet experience and the ability to read music, though. I've gone through periods of my lip not functioning correctly after overdoing it, and it always returned to normal in a few days. I'll bet you get back on track pretty soon, too.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2010
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    clarion sez:
    The more I read here the more I wonder if I've bitten off more than I can chew. Even though I once played for eight years and could blast out a high C, I wonder if I really could have been considered a real brass player. I certainly never had the guidance or the discipline to properly develop my playing skills as many of you have.
    ------------
    Have you bitten off more than you can chew? Oh Hell Yes!! We all have!
    Trumpet is the hardest instrument on the planet to make sing.
    However, once you learn to make the trumpet sing, all the effort before it is pale in comparision to what you can create.
    The trumpet is a lifetime involvement you'll never out do.
    Yes, we all have days where we win and sound great.
    We also have days where the horn wins and we suck.
    But in the defense of the trumpet, the difficulty in playing is IMO somewhat justified since its the nobelist of all instruments.
    The trumpet is mentioned many times in various religious texts and has been used throughout time to hearld royalty.
    So, did you bite off more than you can chew?
    Welcome to the club.
    Dale brings up a very good point about leakage.
    Also, read about mouthpiece pressure and how to breath. You'll be doing great in no time flat.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2010
  4. Mark B

    Mark B Pianissimo User

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    Aug 20, 2010
    Redlands, CA
    Clarion,

    First of all, thank you for your posts. Like a lot of people, I’ve been challenged by recent economic woes and I have questioned my own justification for taking lessons. Like you, I had never had private instruction, unless you count when my HS band director more or less forced me to come in after school. Private lessons seemed like kind of a luxury and it required me to make sacrifices. It was a good thing, though. All the way around, it was a good thing. Your posts further vindicate the decision, in my mind, to take the lessons and put in the practice time. Hopefully, you can find the way to get a lesson, or two. I think you will find it to be well worth the cost.

    I don’t think you’ve bitten off more than you can chew. I believe a person can do whatever they make up their mind to. There are lots of self-taught people that never took lessons. I think most of us, though, really benefit from the guidance of people that have gone before us and mastered these skills.

    To tell you the truth, I’m not sure how long I’ll be able to afford to continue lessons. I’m hoping to stick with it for six months and then see what happens.

    Don’t give up, this is way too much fun and it keeps your brain working in ways that everyday life doesn’t. It also gives you something fun and interesting to focus on in these trying times we’re in.

    Good luck!

    Mark
     
  5. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    Jan 25, 2007
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    Clarion. Don't get too uptight about it. It will come. Just relax. Take a day or two or three off and don't even try playing. I just had an interesting experince myself. My wife and I recently got back from an eleven day cruise. did'nt touch a horn in all those days. Tried to play for about an hour and couldn't get a decent note out. Went back the next day and suddenly found my tonal quality had improved %500. I think the lapse actaully was beneficial because I unlearned(forgot) some of the bad emboucher habits that I'd acquired over time. I've always been an advocate of taking a small holiday from playing when you seem to have hit a weak spot.:thumbsup:
     
  6. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

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    May 30, 2010
    Gilroy, California
    You just get good and bad days .......

    I have to reach back to remember that it was like this in a sport I did.

    Eventually after a few years of VERY intense work on it, it was my life essentially, even on a bad day it was bad for me, Excellent to anyone else.
     
  7. Clarion

    Clarion New Friend

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    Oct 3, 2010
    N.E. Ohio
    Thanks again for all of the encouragement and support. I will be soldiering on after a day or two of rest. This isn't the only instrument I've tried to learn over the years, so I know all about good days and bad days. I'm just a little deflated by how bad it could get and how quickly it could happen.

    I may look into taking a lesson or two, but I'd need to know if the instructor is "worth his salt" so I get my money's worth. But, since I can't do it on a regular basis, that's why I came here - to get advice and learn from a much wider pool of players and practitioners.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2010
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    New York State USA
    for my 2 cents -(I'm 45) I quit for 7 yrs, and am on a comeback trail for about 22 months. the first several months -- a half hour was about the max. of play time.
    Gradually -- I have worked up to about 3 hrs. each day. I am also leaps above and beyond what I ever was as a trumpet player -- no teacher, but you can learn so much over the net, and here.
    and even at 3 hr. practices -- I still overdue -- and end up being an octave lower with poor sound.
    older people take a little extra time to recover -- I really over did one day with a 4.5 hr. plus practice -- cause everything was going well -- and it took like 4 days to fully recover.
    you will do fine -- at 50 you should have discipline to press on --- learn, play, and enjoy. it will come in time and practice, practice, and more practice
     
  9. Jackson Arch

    Jackson Arch Piano User

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    Mar 6, 2010
    Oklahoma
    I declare tomorrow to be 50-year-old guy day! :grouphug: We all get free trumpet lessons from Dale!

    Clarion,
    Listen to these guys and don't give up. I have experienced the same frustrations during the past 8 months or so of "comeback after 30 years" sort of stuff. Really get frustrated at the whimpy chops at times, but it does slowly improve and it does so in an unpredictable fashion. Take the "take a day or two off" advice, and then get back at it. As difficult as it has been for me to accept, 50 year old chops do not develop at the rate of teenage chops. Trust us all, though, it will get better. Remind yourself to breath properly and play on. :play:
     
  10. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I'm old enough to qualify for the lesson, too...

    Free lesson for the day...open your Arban's book and find something that looks nearly impossible to play...work it daily until you can play it...;-)

    When you get the mechanics of the piece down well enough, then you can put most of your effort into making it musical.
     

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