What's the difference between mouthpiece sizes?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trmpt_plyr, Jun 12, 2009.

  1. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    A Bach 5C is nowhere near 16.25mm. Do not follow the published Bach measurements. They are not accurate and do not state where the diameter is measured. Laskey, Curry, and Schilke, just to name a few measure, the 5C at .660" or 16.76 mm.
    A quick look at the Kanstul comparator shows a 5C to have more cup volume than a 1 1/2 C and a much more rounded rim.
    The Bach 5C is for players who do not like a sharp bite on the rim and it requires well developed chops to play it. It is not made for underdeveloped embouchures.
    I used both a 5C and a Reeves 42 and they are really are very different mouthpieces. A Curry 5M I used for a while had a very similar feel to a Bach 5C but did not play like the 5C. The Curry was more efficient. The Reeves felt much smaller to both of them.
    Follow Rowuk's advice. It is spot on and concurs with what a mouthpiece manufacture will tell you.
    Rich Tomasek
     
  2. chetlives

    chetlives Pianissimo User

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    In my 7th year of playing my teacher Rich Bice switched me to a bach 1c. That was after playing a Holton "7c?" with a cushioned rim. I played since th 4th grade, now that was after 7 years. I was lead trumpet in the Symphonic Band by then. The cushion of the Bach had the "feel" of the 7c and was a logical choice for me by my teacher who had a penchant for "large" MPs. If you have a "good strong embouchure" as outlined in the Bach Manual, I would say stick with the 5c. My teacher advised to go for the largest MP you could handle. A Bach 6b is what Chet played and he got a real mellow sound. Come back to me with more queries if you'd like.
     
  3. trmpt_plyr

    trmpt_plyr Pianissimo User

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    Okay, thanks everyone. I have another question: is it okay to switch to different mouthpieces frequently? Would it hurt your lip?
     
  4. chetlives

    chetlives Pianissimo User

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    I think it's ok to use "similar" MPs of similar sizes with different cup depth. For example, I used a 1c for symphonic band and a Schilke 14A4a for jazz and pep bands. Both are similar widths with albeit different "feels". The 14A4a has a sharper "bite" for aharper attacks. I now play a 1 1/2c interchangably with a Reeves set up with then again interchangable cup and backbores. I would say get a good teacher as soon as you can afford it to help you sort through some of these important issues. Do you still have the Bob Reeves dimensions I gave you earlier? That might help as well.
     
  5. sj3209

    sj3209 Piano User

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    Its really simple for Bach MP's:

    The letter is the lowest note you can hit on it.
    The number is the number of octaves above that that you can play with it.

    So a 1c you can only play low C.
    With the 5c you can play 5 octaves.

    So how is that MP change going for you? Have you hit that Quad C yet?

    ROFL
     
  6. SenorTaco

    SenorTaco New Friend

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    a while ago, my instructor told me to switch from my shilke 14 to a bach 5 or 3C so that I could learn to put more air through the horn... sound advice, or no?
     
  7. trmpt_plyr

    trmpt_plyr Pianissimo User

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    The Bach 5c and 3c seem fine for me, but I heard that many people these days are switching to the bach 2 3/4c. I switched too, and it helped me a lot. The air seemed to go through the horn better.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    That is pure BS.
    Mouthpiece success is measured in months to years.

    Many people aren't switching and if you think that you are getting better by switching, you are only fooling yourself. Keep talking yourself into new mouthpieces. That is what keeps the industry alive. My students only need one mouthpiece for the first 5 years of their playing. Then we look at where they want to go and where they are. Many times no changes are needed. I do not buy any of this self help stuff.

    The sooner you get a real practice routine and forget about hardware, the sooner you will REALLY get better. Stop BSing yourself. Get serious and you will not need hardware excuses.
     
  9. trmpt_plyr

    trmpt_plyr Pianissimo User

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    It doesn't make my playing better, it just feels more comfortable and the air goes through more smoothly than all the other mouthpieces that I've tried.
     
  10. regularsopguy

    regularsopguy New Friend

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    Warburton has a good chart of what's equivalent to what. So use both Kanstul and Warburton for reference.
     

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