when is it tine to find a new trumpet teacher ?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by anthony, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    gmonady,

    we are talking about a 58 year old, not a junior high student that has no idea what is next in life. That is why I can assume a communicative rather than a qualitative problem.

    Anthonys last response basically says it all: "sorry Rowuk my teacher is just not there for me".

    No word about what efforts were made, no other indications that we are dealing with an insensitive teacher. No qualifications whatsoever. I can't blame a teacher for anything based on what I have yet read.

    I have never met Anthony or the teacher but what I have read here implies that this is not the first or last similar situation for Anthony. If he has already given up, then there is nothing that we can help with except to wish good luck next time.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Yep, rowuk, your point was well demonstrated when Anthony edited his comment from letting us know his teacher is named "Richard" to that his teacher was just not for him.
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    :dontknow:I understand and agree with most of the postings here ...... Except for the conclusion that Anthony is a "quitter" based on very little information. I don't think that's fair. Bear in mind that, even though he's older and not a HS student, that doesn't mean that he automatically has more ability to assess the qualities of a private music teacher.

    Some of them are crap. Let's not mince words here ..... some are detrimental to the progress and to the student's whole outlook. It's a two way street: A student comes in with money and enthusiasm and a lousy teacher will give cheap, thoughtless instruction while erroding their joy for the instrument and for music.

    For Anthony, we need to know more to advise you better. However, I personally would not air any of that in here if I was having trouble with my teacher. I WAS and I've already moved on, but no detalis on this forumn. With loads of experience with exceptionally good teachers, I know when it's time to go. You have to protect your enthusiasm at all costs.

    Also, the term "quitter" is highly subjective ..... i'm an older player who has been through this a lot with a variety of instruments. When I pass on an instrument, I never think of myself as a "quitter". I'm auditioning each new instrument to see if it's going to satisfy something for me musically. Call me a quitter if you want, but if I hadn't quit them, I would currently be playing:

    Electric Bass
    Saxophone
    Clarinet
    Trombone
    Flute
    Oboe
    Cello
    Harmonica
    Piano
    Guitar
    Drums
    Trumpet

    I don't have time for all that, so I play guitar and trumpet (and sing). Sometimes the best thing you can do is to quit something (like cigarettes, where being a quitter can save your life).:dontknow:

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2011
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I am not assuming that Anthony is a "quitter"! I just notice that there is no evidence presented that his teacher is bad. There is no mention made of mutual goals rather one comment that actually could have been "nice" instead of blatant.

    There just is no info to justify changing OR preserveering. I will do neither a disservice and tried to offer standard communication techniques.
     
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Right, I agree with you that there's not much to go on here. I'm a bit surprised at all the responders who said to jump without much information (hardly any, really).

    As a point of practicality, it's good to consider how many other potential teachers are out there to try, in your area. When it's your dime, I say you are auditioning the teacher, not the other way around.

    Turtle
     
  6. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Ok Sorry about the 'Richard ' remark BUT two years ago when I first started with my teacher about one month into taking lessons and I was only taking lessons once a month with him ( and now I am told by other teachers I have spoken to that you should take lessons once a week) he had taught me to single tonguing next lesson I play for him he says that is terrible but I just started to practice it, said I was sloppy not short and even ok I understand but I had only practiced single tonguing a very shot time .He looked annoyed and I just think he does not care sorry for all the complaining Anthony
     
  7. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Anthony, What I suggest is get a second opinion. If you don't feel you are making progress, it can't hurt to try a new approach. I've taught lots of comeback players and each one is different with different Strenghts and weaknesses. I feel it's my jod as a teacher to help in any way I can. Check out my web sire. The first one's free.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Anthony,
    can you answer the questions that I posted above?
    A couple of questions first:
    1) were goals part of your initial conversation or did you negotiate a more flexible "when we get to it" approach?
    2) are the teachers expectation clear? I get heat here at TM all the time for my "attitude" but have never lost a real life student (in spite of being equally "tough"). My kids can cancel a lesson up to 5 minutes before it starts. If they show up, then they are prepared. If not, they get sent home. Prepared is a flexible term but they know EXACTLY what to do.
    3) have you talked to your teacher about those comments? Communication is a two way street and often we need more than one opportunity to get a feel for getting the message across.

    They are critical to decent advice. If a 58 year old comes to me, my first questions are the above. I do expect THEM however to be clear about what they want. Just to be clear, it is tougher to learn new habits when you are older. Without established goals, frustration is programmed.
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Rowuk and all; IMO the older we get it becomes harder to rid bad habits than to learn new ones. Rote is rote and just takes more repetitions aka practice to become a new habit when one gets older, or so it seems in my own personal case. Still, we must be guarded that we don't slip back into the bad habits ... and believe me, I've got dozens of those myself, maybe even a gross or more if I were to accumulate non-musical related ones also.

    The best answer to your first question, that I've heard is: "To improve my playing ability." and my answer is: "I can guide you towards doing so, but the effort necessary to achieve such you must do yourself."
     
  10. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Rowuk no I must admit I at first did not set goals I thought it was too early ,when my teacher showed up for my first lesson and heard me play he looked annoyed after hearing me play .Then he said to me this is going to take a while..... okay I did the work I practiced every day a year later I forgot to slur some passage in a piece I was playing he told me I am getting on your case about it because you are getting better.Then one lesson I ask him about a piece should I listen to how it goes on the recording or first play it then listen he said well it is not like your going to go play for The New York Philharmonic, Anthony
     

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