Where should range come in a daily practice routine?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by NYCO10, Feb 27, 2010.

  1. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 20, 2010
    United Kingdom
    After my first week of my new practise routine i am already feeling the benifits, my practice routine includes lip buzzing, mp buzzing, long tones, toungin (s,d,t), flexibility, etudes and repetiore (in that order, with rest inbetween). my question is where would i fit range exercies in ? )atm it takes me 45 mins to do this routine with a certain amount of time on each thing)

    Peace NYCO10
     
  2. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    I would fit it under your flexibility exercises. Also, I'm sure you're practicing different scales. Here's something you might want to try:
    Play the C Maj. scale. Now play the C maj. scale starting on the C on the staff and up to high C. Can you do it? If you can't (without using a lot of pressure) then you might want to work on the scale in two versions:
    The low version of the scale and the high version of the scale. In time you'll be splicing the two scales together in a seamless fashion.
    By the way, great sounding workout! Keep up the good work!
     
  3. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 20, 2010
    United Kingdom
    Thanks, that is one of my other goals i already have a great sound (i like to think so!) and am trying to reduce the pressure it takes so i can play to a high c without using any pressure at all! i can play to a g on top of the stave but my tone is weak.

    Peace NYCO10
     
  4. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Here's a good little assessment about mouthpiece pressure from one of the greatest trumpet players of all time. I gleaned it from his book:
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The fastest way to obtain notes on a brass instrument is to adjust the amount of mouthpiece pressure against the lips. Very little pressure for low notes and a lot of pressure for high notes. It makes sense and, it works!
    Since it seems to be human nature to follow the path of least resistance, we find the average brass player (who isn’t blessed with a good instructor) obliged to develop their own PRESSURE SYSTEM of playing. The only advantage of this system is a “quick start”, let me point out the disadvantages of “strong-arm trumpet playing as I have seen them:

    FAULTY INTONATION (playing out of tune)is the most common failing of this method. This type of player tends to move sloppily up and down to notes instead of striking the center of the intended pitch.
    WEAK LOWER REGISTER Continued pressure causes the lips to swell or thicken to the point that they will not vibrate at the low frequency required in the lower register. The tone in this register is usually “windy”.
    COURSE EXECUTION An inability to play delicately. There are short and detached and have a sharp, ragged edge to them instead of being light and round as a bubble
    BLIND NOTES Notes that fail to sound out, often happening in soft passages.
    UNEVEN SLURRING Fails to get a smooth, flowing sound and pitch usually suffers.
    SPLIT NOTES When the player attacks a note, then flies off to the partial above or below the intended note.
    NUMB LIPS This is when the lip become numb from cutting off the circulation. An often asked question on TM.
    DAMAGE TO LIPS After years of playing with extreme pressure the tissue will become damaged not unlike feet after wearing too tight shoes.
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    If you suffer from any of these symptoms, assess yourself by playing a scale (two octaves if possible) up and down and ask yourself “am I pressing the mouthpiece harder against my lips as I go up and then ease up on the pressure as I go down?”
    If your notes are dictated by the amount of pressure you use, then work to reduce the pressure with exercises and while doing this, play close attention to what the lips and mouthpiece are doing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2010
  5. Carroll W. Schroeder

    Carroll W. Schroeder Pianissimo User

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    Nov 3, 2009
    McMinnville, Oregon
    Hello Markie, thanks for the reminder of why my teacher wants to keep me working on the lower register and to go slow, it is easy to just put more pressure and and get a quick high C but it does not last long. Its your kind of advise and TM that makes better trumpet players out of all of us. Keep on Buzzin. CW
     
  6. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi Carroll,
    Glad to have been of some help. Keep up the great work!
     

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