Which Valve Oil & Why

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Rushtucky, Sep 5, 2009.

  1. azhiba

    azhiba New Friend

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    Aug 25, 2009
    Trumpetnick... why did you swap? I am not a valve oil connoisseur or ditto feinschmecker but find T2 great, although I need to use it once or twice a day.

    (I oil the valves through the mouthpiece receiver to save time and to spare them from my potential clumsiness)
     
  2. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Vidin, Bulgaria
    Actually T2 is great, but I found UP better. I lasts longer and it gives slightly smoother feel. The difference however was greater on my Olds cornet - since I bought it from Ebay the valves were a bit sluggish even immediatly after applying. Now with UP they move really fast and easy. Can't explain it, but it works.
     
  3. ska

    ska Pianissimo User

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    Silicon oil, and when I don't have anything, spit (yes, you spit on the pump) works best. You have unlimited supply of it and it works :)
     
  4. azhiba

    azhiba New Friend

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    Aug 25, 2009
    Might be worth a try then (-:
    Thank you!
     
  5. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    If you need to oil your valves once or twice a day, how can you say that the oil you're using is "great?" It's lousy if you have to oil that frequently.

    I've started using the Denis Wick Valve Oil and find that even with playing a couple of hours a day, I only have to oil my valves about once a week. To my way of thinking, THAT's a great oil.

    And oiling through the mouthpiece receiver has never made any sense to me -- all the oil coats the tubing and very little gets to the valves, and even then, most gets to the 3rd valve with almost nothing getting to the first valve.

    If you want to avoid removing the valves for fear of clumsiness there are several things you can do: 1) put the oil in the holes in the bottom caps -- that way you know that each piston gets its fair share of the lubricant; 2) learn not to be clumsy; 3) always hold your trumpet over a towel placed inside your case and remove the valves while the trumpet is in the case, so that if you drop the piston it will land on something soft and won't have far to fall so it will be safe.
     
  6. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I think that this has more to do with the leadpipe application. When I was using T2 on a regular basis, once every 2-3 days was fine.
     
  7. bigtiny

    bigtiny Mezzo Forte User

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    Aug 14, 2005
    I've never been one to focus on a lot of the 'accessories' involved with playing the trumpet. I've pretty much used the same mouthpiece for 35 years, I always used Vaseline (there was another thread on this) for my slides, and since 1978 (until recently) i used Al Cass oil.

    In the last year, I've had a horn custom built, my '65 Benge's valves rebuilt, and gotten a new Adams flugelhorn. Since making the switch to these horns, I decided I wanted to move to a non-petroleum based (synthetic) oil. Why? Well moving away from petroleum based products seems to be a good idea and this is one small way I can do this.

    I use Hetman's because that's what my trumpet tech recommended.

    And according to the guys at Osmun, Hetmans (I don't know if that means all synthetics or not) will NOT last longer than regular oils....

    bigtiny
     
  8. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    I too used to use Al Cass Fast Oil for a short time, after a long time with Holton Electric Oil. Because I have a rather large 'accumilation' of cornets and trumpets many of them get somewhat infrequent use. Before my switch over to Hetmans oils I just expected that the valves in a horn that had been in storage for a couple of weeks would have stuck valves. Since I started to use Hetmans oils I discover that even if a horn is left in storage for a few months the valves are still slick and fast. If Osmuns is referring to the service life of oils used in horns that are in constant,[frequent] usage, I might agree. If they are saying that Hetmans will evaporate away at the same rate as a petroleum distilate oil, I would challenge their statement.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  9. trumpettrax

    trumpettrax Piano User

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    Mar 18, 2006
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    Have you ever tried it? ????

    trax
     
  10. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I don't need to. Even if the evaporation is zero, the condensation would wash away the oil for a month, if the horn is played. If you wait for your valves to start sticking before you apply again, that's another question...
     

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