Who did you stydy with?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by songbook, May 19, 2015.

  1. songbook

    songbook Piano User

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    Apr 25, 2010
    I would like to know who some of you accomplished trumpet players studied with. Not so much the bands you've played with, but the teachers who helped you the most and the lessons that helped you to become the musician you turned out to be. I know it takes many years of practice, but are there some things that come to mind right away?
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Duped, for some reason.
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    "Accomplished" players? Define "accomplished." Do you mean someone who goes out and gigs and gets paid to do it, or are you looking for something a bit more than that? If it's the former category, that's me. If you need more than that, I can't help you.
     
  4. songbook

    songbook Piano User

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    Someone who makes a living playing or teaching trumpet
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I studied under Gerald Webster at Washington State University, but picked up lots of tips on playing styles playing in various orchestras in America and Europe.

    As for pedagogy, I played through a whole bunch of trumpet methods, seeing which exercises worked different muscle groups and I read a bit. Csikszentmihaly, Seligman, Gallwey, Pirsig, Herrigal, Watts, Suzuki, St. Augustine, Plotinus, etc.
     
  6. songbook

    songbook Piano User

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    Very impressive Vulgano Brother.
     
  7. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Sax: Sadao Watanabe, John Giordano, Dino Govani.
    Trumpet: John Haynie, Richard Lum, Bob Fleming.
    Composition: Samuel Adler, Dr. William P Latham, Dr. Martin Mailman, Luigi Zaninelli, Jerzy Sapieyevski.
    Conducting: David Pollitt, Donald Thulean, Dr. Robert Garofalo.
    Arranging: Dick Grove, Masahiko Sato, Morgan Powell.
     
  8. songbook

    songbook Piano User

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    My God! I knew some of you were gifted musicians, but this blows me away.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I kinda sorta made a living as a military bandsman, but I never truly "studied" with anyone really. With that said, there have been a couple of things I've picked up over the years that have really stuck with me.

    The first came from a percussion clinic I attended. I got there late so the clinician, a collegiate level percussion instructor, was toward the end of his clinic, but he told a story about when he was first attending college, and he went to his percussion instructor for some advice on how to improve his drum roll. His thought was that his instructor was going to show him some trick, or impart some sage words of wisdom that would really smooth things out. Instead, his instructor said, "If you want to improve your roll, then roll - 10 minutes a day, ever day."

    The takeaway from that is that sometimes it isn't a matter of learning how to finesse something, it's a matter of refinement through time and focused hard work, honing in on things as you go - most of the time, there are no shortcuts.

    Another real eye opener, which also happened to come at a drum clinic, was when the clinician called for 5 volunteers, and using his sticks, sitting behind his drums, had them each play the same basic rock beat. They all sounded completely different.

    The takeaway from that was to not chase gear as a means to get a particular sound, and that we each have our own distinct sound - we'll never sound like another player because we aren't them, so the sooner we get comfortable with our own sound and style, the sooner we can really start to build upon that because we won't be wasting time trying to sound like a player we'll never ever sound like.

    I've adopted both of those lessons and incorporated them into my own playing. The first lesson wasn't surprising - at one point I had excellent articulation skills because I worked on just articulation in a very focused way without using any kind of prescribe exercise. The second lesson came when I was in my late 30s, but it had a profound effect on my trumpet playing in the wedding band. It wasn't that I completely ditched what was on the page, but I certainly developed my own sound and approach toward playing those lines.
     
  10. Tjnaples

    Tjnaples Piano User

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    Adam Rapa
     

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