Who's your most important teacher?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by amtrpt, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. westview1900

    westview1900 Piano User

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    Nov 30, 2005
    The way that I think about this is that the teacher brings the student information which I liken to food. Then the student digests the information and uses it to create music. But, the student cannot be passive. He must take that information; he must use what he deems to be useful and discard which he cannot use. Too many people think that they can learn passively, as if it is the teacher's job to make the student learn and become proficient. It doesn't work that way and if we can become our own teacher, then we bring the information to ourselves in a way which we can comprehend and internalize it.
     
  2. wvtrumpet

    wvtrumpet Pianissimo User

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    This is a great thread and makes me think of several of my early teachers....All were great advocates of learning to practice correctly, and learning to fix things yourself. I guess the old adage about giving a man a fish he eats for a day, teach him to fish he eats for a lifetime. It's cheesy, but its so true. I have really enjoyed this thread!!!!
     
  3. amtrpt

    amtrpt Pianissimo User

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    wvtrumpet,
    I'm glad you liked this thread. I've been extremely impressed with the great posting on this one. Thanks everyone!
    Andrew
     
  4. trpt2345

    trpt2345 Mezzo Forte User

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    May 21, 2006
    Morelia, Mexico
    My most important teacher was Barbara Butler. Once I left Eastman when I encountered a problem I'd ask myself, what would Barbara say? And the answer would pop up. I realized I had internalized what she had imparted to me and that it would stay with me forever.

    I do tell my own students that the real lesson doesn't happen at "the lesson",the lesson is just me checking up on what they're doing, the real lesson is the seven days in the practice room. When we get together I'm checking and pointing them in the right direction, they have to actually go there.
     
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  5. iainmcl

    iainmcl Pianissimo User

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    Nov 4, 2006
    New Zealand
    Wow. this thread is awesome.
    I'm gonna copy/paste a few of these comments to keep as reference.
     
  6. Athos

    Athos New Friend

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    Mar 23, 2007
    Interestingly, I don't remember you cratering on that first solo class performance, Andrew. I remember an oddity or two (wasn't perfect, okay), but I also remember thinking "what a sound!" I thought your sound was so like Barbara's it was kind of scary. Even though it was clear you were having some problems, you didn't let it take you out of your game, and continued to play aggressively.

    You never know what your audience is thinking, eh?
     
  7. amtrpt

    amtrpt Pianissimo User

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    Thanks for the comment Athos. Nice too see you posting here. Don't be a stranger!
    Best,
    Andrew
    ps. How's the new job treating you?
     
  8. Athos

    Athos New Friend

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    Mar 23, 2007
    The new job is great, and seems to be a good fit. We just played Fidelio in concert, and next up is an Elliott Carter birthday celebration.

    Thanks for asking... I will be checking in here.

    Mike
     
  9. Gary Schutza

    Gary Schutza Pianissimo User

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    Apr 6, 2007
    Kansas City
    Andrew,
    HI!

    We probably talked about this before in KC. I think a great teacher teaches the student to teach him/her self. I can remember all of my best teachers saying things like: If you find yourself in this situation with your playing, these type of things work....... Of course, this requires one to be a good student as well.

    The only trouble is that at my advanced age I only remember those things after I've had to re-solve them. Sort of a "Oh yeah, Mr. Kaderabek said that would work, I remember now!"

    Oh, and by the way. I can agree with you about Barbara Butler and Charlie Geyer being the best teachers-especially by the numbers of successful students. But it's gotta be said that even Barbara and Charlie couldn't teach a lump of coal. You were a good student and so they were great teachers for you. A good match. I never studied with either of them. I can't imagine a better teacher FOR ME than Frank Kaderabek. It was a good match, though not for everyone.

    I'm enjoying your column.

    Wishing you the best,
    Chip
     
  10. amtrpt

    amtrpt Pianissimo User

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    Chip,
    Thanks for the reply. I completely agree with everything you said. I hope that all is well in KC.
    Best,
    Andrew
     

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