Why do nearly all concert classical musicians play from sheet music?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Trumpet1705x, Oct 8, 2018.

  1. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    There are some modern works that require intense counting and subdividing of beats.
    If you don't count, you find yourself in a "guess and by golly" situation, meaning I guess I'll come in now and by golly I was wrong.
     
  2. Franklin D

    Franklin D Forte User

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    Maybe I posted this before, this crazy moment in which Maria Joao Pires realises she found herself in the wrong concert.
    She should play a Mozart concerto in a lunch concert with the RCO (quite informal) so she just sat down to play her Mozart program of that year not realising the orchestra would play another concerto that was on her program a year earlier.
    Great example that solists travel with their program and play it by heart, she left the music of this concerto on her table in Portugal, of course she played the whole concert without a problem, complete from memory though she had not played it for quite some time:

     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2018
  3. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    One time I was quite proud of myself was when our community band took part in and won a competition in another town. I was playing euphonium that time from the bass clef parts but the fellow in charge of bringing our music folders decided to just pull out the music for the day to save lugging the lot and he left the euphonium parts behind, so I played everything from memory. Our main competition piece was Florentiner March.

    --bumblebee
     
  4. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Similarly, I had a featured solo on a piece in concert that had complex harmonies in it. I had formerly relied on written music, and the music fell off the stand and I had to play it by ear. Worked well. Sometimes there's a freedom that works by ignoring the printed page.

    p.s. Saw that Pires concert in the past. Astounding.
     
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  5. BigDub

    BigDub Utimate User

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    I have come to the end of a page of music and it dawns on me that I didn’t actually ever look at it the entire time.
     
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  6. Tpt_Guy

    Tpt_Guy New Friend

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    I posted it here. I know it posted because I looked at it afterward and got an email notification that someone had replied to this thread. I only get those notifications when someone replies to a thread after I do.
     
  7. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I would not rule out a forum software bug. The administrators might have access to logfiles which might contain clues to explain what happened.

    --bumblebee
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    We all go through a phase in our march towards perfect transposition from sight where we practice the music to the point that muscle memory comes into play. I've found myself fingering along with pieces and knowing the entrances with pieces on the radio which I "recognized" but didn't "know." I should have listened to more recordings of orchestral music in university, because of the rich library they have (as you can figure, this was in the days of punch-card computers and card catalogues), but got obsessed with the few pieces I had recordings of: Beethoven 9, Rite of Spring, Concerto for Orchestra, Mathis der Maler, Firebird, all three Chase albums, a bunch of Maynard and Tower of Power, some Joni Mitchell, Pat Metheny, Rush, Miles....

    Most of what I learned in my time as third trumpet in the Spokane Symphony was style, and how to emulate our wonderful Principal Larry Jess and quite a few warhorses. Starting out in Germany as a freelancer the norm was one rehearsal the day of the concert. I'd get the music in advance or already had it (played lots of Bach) and practice it in the best style I could, and show up a blank slate and generally please the conductor and/or first trumpet if I wasn't playing first. For the times I was a "springer," sight-reading concerts, I'd rely on what I knew how to do well, which was to play in such a way that there was nothing to argue about, which I learned from Larry.

    Still want the music in front of me, though.
     
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  9. BigDub

    BigDub Utimate User

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    If you remember what you said, why not just repost it? We believe you. Just do it. This isn’t the IRS or anything. You won’t be penalized. "Stuff" happens. Shake off the dust, get up, and fix it.
    Life is too short for this.
     
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  10. BigDub

    BigDub Utimate User

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    And when I realize it, I sometimes shudder, at first, but then I come to my senses that I must have been very familiar with the piece, so I feel pretty good about that. There are other times when I am only looking at the line, or section of music, not individual notes. Since I have repeated them many times, the visual is only a slight reminder of where I am in the music. A mere guide, rather than a note by note micro management situation.
     

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