Why do people try to sound dark?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Brass_of_all_Trades, Sep 20, 2014.

  1. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

    8,612
    2,128
    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    cool -- can you PM me her number? I would like to talk to her about distractions that accompany trumpet playing --- ROFL ROFL ROFL (do you know if she's single?) - ROFL
     
  2. richtom

    richtom Forte User

    Age:
    67
    1,538
    1,273
    Dec 7, 2003
    The only recordings you will hear Herseth on his Bach 7B or C are the very early Kubelik recordings on the Mercury label. Those recordings set an incredible standard for their day. Mono, of course, but very good even in this day.
    Herseth's accident occurred in 1952. Reiner did not arrive until 1953. The first recordings you will hear Herseth on the large Bachs are Also Sprach Zarathustra and Ein Heldenleben.
    Reiner did conduct Herseth prior to the accident as a guest conductor and wanted to know who was the "jewel" principal trumpet. This was around 1949 or 50.
    Rich T.
     
  3. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

    2,107
    1,091
    Aug 2, 2010
    North Carolina
    Nope. I hear you have a reputation. Sorry.
     
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

    8,612
    2,128
    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    don't listen to GM ---- just like the thread --- he often tells stories about me that are from the "dark side" of his imagination ----- never listen to GM --- ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  5. lipnutz

    lipnutz Pianissimo User

    147
    27
    Dec 17, 2013
    His timbre does not sound dark to me; rather typically trumpet-like. But it is soft/low volume, expressive/poignant. Just my two cents worth. Thanks for posting the vid. Enjoyed it.
     
  6. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

    5,332
    4,732
    Aug 7, 2013
    Lagos, Nigeria
    We never had these terminologies when I was being taught, and my understanding of them still seems to change according to who posted the last comment. I'd be grateful if someone in the know would help me out on a few things I just can't get clear in my head.

    1) Is it possible to play a low C pianissimo but bright?

    2) Is it possible to play a high C fortissimo but dark?

    3) Where does the "Teutonic sound" fit amongst these pigeonholes?

    Youtube clips would probably help give the best explanation.

    Many thanks in advance as they say in these parts. :-)
     
  7. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

    3,936
    1,830
    Jan 21, 2010
    Great Southern Land
    Good questions, and remarkably similar to something I asked a while back:
    http://www.trumpetmaster.com/vb/f131/videos-soundclips-bright-dark-tone-68608.html

    I'd like to say I got a lot of good responses, but I still didn't feel I understood...

    --bumblebee
     
    Sethoflagos likes this.
  8. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

    2,107
    1,091
    Aug 2, 2010
    North Carolina
    He needs a vintage Committee then he'd be there. He def sounded more typically "trumpety"...just playing softly and expressively at beginning and end. I could just imagine the improvement there would be with a good Martin in his hands. Is it for everything? Of course not...but for THIS? Yes. Absolutely.
    I LOVED the piece.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,128
    9,302
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    There you have it, the true definition of Dark.
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,128
    9,302
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Yes and Yes.

    It lies within which muscle groups you choose to teut (toot) the horn and the integrative brain circuits of the individual interpreting the sound.
     

Share This Page