Why do people try to sound dark?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Brass_of_all_Trades, Sep 20, 2014.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I wouldn't say that. More Bud and less Wynton has more to do with style than with frequency response. Both play BRILLIANTLY!

    Can we end this stupidity with "dark". I can understand those that have no idea about style or sound blabbing about it, but all of us have grown out of this - or?
     
  2. neal085

    neal085 Mezzo Forte User

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    VB, that's kind of what is in my head. I relate dark sound to certain styles of music and pieces more than just simply a tone, and I tend to think equipment isn't much of a factor.

    I think of 'dark' sound as what I would hear in soulful, melodic, introspective music.

    Bright is what I hear in a Vivaldi piece.

    Part of my practicing the last several weeks includes recording myself, and I find that I can produce a variety of sounds depending on what music I'm playing, but my equipment never varies, and rich tone is what I'm after, regardless of style. I once really startled myself by how much I sounded like the artist I was trying to emulate. What came out of my horn was the exact sound I had in my head.

    Going back to what I think someone already mentioned, I don't think we all define 'dark' sound the same way, so that confuses the conversation, as well.
     
  3. eviln3d

    eviln3d Pianissimo User

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    While there is something to be said for it being more player than horn, I there are some equipment that simply will not ever sound dark (in my way of thinking dark is just the opposite of sounding bright)... go get a Schilke 6a4a and try not to sound bright. Some equipment is just not conducive to anything but a bright knife like sound.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Dark is no problem whatsoever - with any mouthpiece size or shape. It is a function of the sound concept and staying within bounds of the technical pssibilities. Just like loudspeakers with 6" woofers claiming 20 Hz bass response (it is possible), there are enough ways to play even the smallest mouthpieces with a dark chocolate sound - creamy, smokey, no bite. Testosterone is the biggest problem with lead mouthpieces not the cup diameter or depth!
     
  5. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    I'd be fascinated to know the differences. :-)
     
  6. Brass_of_all_Trades

    Brass_of_all_Trades New Friend

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    F trumpets were used to play in the same range as modern Bb and C trumpets despite being longer while alto trumpets played in a lower register. I think alto trumpets also used a different mouthpiece.
     
  7. eviln3d

    eviln3d Pianissimo User

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    If you can make a 6a4a sound dark, then lets see it a youtube clip to prove it. Otherwise I'm calling BS on that one... Or if you would rather stick with your speak analogy then go find some tweeters and try to play bass throw them or a sub woofer to listen to a piccolo... While the chops play a huge part in the sound, there equipment can certainly limit what is possible.
     
  8. Bay Area Brass

    Bay Area Brass Piano User

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    In regards to art, which music is, there is no one way that trumpets are "supposed to sound like-" It's a creative choice. It's about using the right approach and tools for the job and genre. In regards to using a smaller mouthpiece to get a dark sound, you can get a dark sound with one by how you approach playing it, but with a bigger mouthpiece you will get a thicker/fatter tone with that dark buttery sound-that's why lead players usually play smaller mouthpieces and jazz soloists tend to go larger-exceptions to the rule of course.
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    eviln3d, I play and sound dark on a JET-TONE Custom model 1B. It makes my Giardinelli 5S look like the Grand Canyon. I play it because it's comfortable. "Dark" is in your head.
     
  10. Bay Area Brass

    Bay Area Brass Piano User

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    Approach and conception are factors, but so is equipment. One can sound dark on a smaller piece just as one can play high lead on a bigger piece, but the right tool for the job makes that job easier.
     

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