Why do people try to sound dark?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Brass_of_all_Trades, Sep 20, 2014.

  1. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    for the record -- KT can blend with anyone ---- it's the yoyo's in the band with Bach Strads and some 14A4A shallow mpc that can't --- or wont' blend ---- just saying, some people really don't know how to blend with others --- OR don't want to. I call them the "bright" people, cause they seem to think they know everything anyhow --- of course the trombone section is usually referred to as the "dark side" of the band --- interesting
     
  2. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

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    blending is between the ears, no doubt about it. if you can't do something, then that's one thing. if you can and simply refuse, then you're an idiot, pure and simple. with a bach strad, there's no excuse not to be able to play anything, any way, any time, unless you're just not very good, period.
     
  3. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I think our 1st trumpet section is a little "mystified" by KT here who sits down in the 3rd section but can play higher notes than they can --- it's not a high note competition per say, so I think they try to hard to make themselves be heard ( I think it's their egos were shattered a bit when KT arrived and humbly does his thing in the 3rd section -- although I warm up a bit with the fastest scales ever, to the bottom of the range up to the G an octave above the one that sits on top of the staff -- I occasionally go play trombone also --- but they should be empowered to play better not to play louder and such
     
  4. Cat

    Cat New Friend

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    I can understand wanting that "darker" tone - some music (or interpretations of a particular piece) call for it. But honestly, I doubt you'll ever quite get it with a trumpet. They're designed to sound bright, piercing and majestic.

    I'll side with those who've already said it - if you want smoky and dark, go for a cornet - but not a long cornet like a lot of Americans use, try a short, shepherd's crook cornet like we Brits use in our brass bands. I'm sure somebody will say that their long cornet does indeed have that smokier sound and there are probably exceptions to the long/short rule, but by and large, if you want this change in sound, you'll more likely get it with a shepherd's crook cornet than with the longer version.

    However it does pay to remember that, as with trumpets, some cornets sound different depending on the manufacturer. For instance, some Yamaha (short) cornets, don't quite have that darker sound that other makes do. So, if you can, try before you buy to make sure you get the sound you're looking for.

    I have a Yamaha trumpet and a Besson cornet and the difference in "colouring" is quite noticeable. (Although, to the eye, they're both silver. ;-) )
     
  5. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    Chris BOTTI and Friends - Night Sessions, Live in Concert 2002 - YouTube

    THIS is dark.
    It's a 1940 Committee. And THIS is a gorgeous, velvety, restrained, though still rich/sonorous sound without being biting.
    In small ensembles playing a more introspective piece a darker sound keeps the trumpet in sonic parity with the other instruments.
    In some orchestral pieces the trumpet is used as accentuation and would be expected to be bright, with the horns carrying the core of the sound.
    It all depends on what is the intended goal.
     
  6. scottfsmith

    scottfsmith Pianissimo User

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    I think you are confusing "dark" and "good". Many dark tones are no good. The goal isn't necessarily a dark tone, its a good dark tone.

    I agree there are many more dimensions than just dark vs bright, and just going for a dark tone and nothing else will probably get you nowhere. But, its still a useful term. My personal favorite descriptive is "vocal" (like the human voice), that was the greatest compliment in the 18th century for any instrumental tone.
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    It's also going through a sound guy who can and does with it as he pleases. I had one sound man tell me to just blow the horn in the mic, I'll make you sound good! SMH!! If I'm too "bright", he just cuts out the highs and makes me "dark". Again, SMH!!!
     
  8. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    Yeah..there's a sound guy. But don't you think Botti's sound (whether cut or natural, I suspect it's pretty close to natural) is nice in this environment and purposely dark? I do. This is what I see as the prototypical Committee sound, and I happen to like it.
     
  9. jimc

    jimc Mezzo Piano User

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  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Funny, but wouldn't that make it soft?? ROFL
     

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