Why I Play Vintage

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Dviglis, Dec 1, 2014.

  1. ConnDirectorFan

    ConnDirectorFan Fortissimo User

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    I call that the Conn Director effect - the 15A has a .485 bore, yet it feels like a smaller bore. Connstellation 38A has a .485 bore, and feels like a .485 bore...

    "Air"? Maybe a placebo inhaler...
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Then that means you will place it in my keep so it doesn't freeze up? I will use it... REGULARLY!
     
  3. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    An interesting point. There are a lot of vintage horns that are really hard to play unless you match them very well with an appropriate mouthpiece, and frequently that turns out to be the original.

    Makes me wonder whether more modern horns are designed to play well with mouthpieces that are currently in production... like "make sure this horn is the best horn on the planet using a Bach 3C!"

    Tom
     
  4. Dviglis

    Dviglis Mezzo Piano User

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    And not only did they make high quality pro horns but, they also made all of the student horns with the same care and craftsmanship, but simply with cheaper materials or less intricate design/internal specs to make them the best of both worlds for newcomers.


    As a side note, I am happy to see this thread getting lots of positive attention (something I am not particularly known for...)
     
  5. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Tom,

    Do you think it is the gap, bore, cup, or rim that is making the difference? For all the older horns I have, I have really only used more modern mouthpieces (Bach 3C, 7c, 10 1/2, etc.)
     
  6. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Using the 1950's cutoff for "vintage", I have only one vintage horn I'd play by choice on a real gig. That's the 1929 Conn 22B New York Symphony model I own. Funny thing is, I like it because it's built, plays, and sounds like a more modern instrument. Sort of like a Bach Strad 37 to me, but with a bit easier upper register. That's the newest horn I own that is 1950's or earlier. The next newest one in that range is from 1907...:D
     
  7. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    I think it's a combination of a lot of these things. A lot of older trumpets are medium or small bore and really tight... and their original mouthpieces were huge in comparion. For example a Buescher 88-D, which was their default supplied mouthpiece, has a 21 throat. Works great on the medium bore horns it was developed for. Not so much on the medium large. :-)

    I tried I can't tell you how many Rudy Mück pieces I tried on my horns, but I couldn't any of them to work, for example.

    But as a sweeping generalization, I don't think these older, small, tight trumpets will play all that well with a Bach piece with a standard 28 throat.

    Tom
     
  8. tjcombo

    tjcombo Forte User

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    I love my vintage horns but would be wary of saying they're superior to modern horns. The thing that infected me with n+1 was the outrageously good value of (some) vintage horns. With costs in many cases a tenth or less of a similar modern horn, I can have a stable of beautiful instruments to play.

    +1 Dale re the old 22B.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I think there is much truth to this comment... but even with the right mouthpiece, I find I still have to wrestle the slotting while playing in the staff with my Martin Committee. But I find this still a virtue, rather than a hindrance. With less tight of a slotting feel, you are free as a musician to bend and play with tones. This is art. What vintage horns offer is the ability to paint tones, to produce an art that modern horns just cannot achieve without excessive amount of effort.
     
  10. Pinstriper

    Pinstriper Mezzo Forte User

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    Yeah, says me. I'm the World's #1 Top Expert on "What's My Opinion ?" I'm infallible on it, actually. It's been documented and everything.

    If I found myself suddenly obsessed with Renaissance or Baroque music to the exclusion of everything else, I guess I'd probably grow a little goatee, cut off one ear, and knock over a museum to get an instrument. I won't know until it happens, though.
     

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