Why I Play Vintage

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Dviglis, Dec 1, 2014.

  1. mickvanflugel

    mickvanflugel Forte User

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    Nostalgia is fine. It might be a delusion too. ;-)

    "Things were better" - well no, not per se, as this perception is higly subjective and glosses over some hard facts.

    There is nothing wrong with subjective perceptions at all, and as I grow vintage myself I often share your view, but
    one should be aware of the subjective nature of these perceptions and try to give modern times a chance too ;-)
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    You are struggling with the same things as all of the generations before us. Perhaps we should take this traditional (vintage?) time of year and focus on making NOW better for ourselves and those around us. That requires no hardware!

    I must admit, if I had the opportunity to do it all again, I wouldn't change anything - not because everything was so great, rather because the "process" is what makes me "individual". Life, death, joy and sorrow are all part of the package.
     
  3. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    My friends don't understand my view of technology and why I might be nostalgic for some but not others.

    For example, a television. An analog color TV manufactured in 1960 is a remarkable achievement... for 1960. It's remarkable that it works at all, much less as well as it does. A modern digital LCD is so much better!

    A car. A 1960 car with a carburetor and mechanical ignition driven by vacuum is again a remarkable achievement... for 1960. A modern fuel-injected car with computer-controlled ignition is so much better!

    In these cases, "using vintage" means a conscious choice to get a poor result for some other reason.

    Other technology hasn't really changed all that much and there is no real functional difference between new and old. My 1934 AM/SW console radio works as well (actually better) than most AM radios you can buy today. A KitchenAid mixer from 1960 works just the same as a new one.

    The same with your trumpet. There is zero difference in technology between my 1950 Buescher Model 228 Lightweight 400 than the latest from Schillke (for example). The design is different, sure... but that's true in the comparison of any one model of trumpet versus another.

    What this wandering nonsense means is that vintage or new isn't better because they're vintage or new... they're better because you've found a horn (or family of horns) that work well for you, you're happy, and you can make music... and that's all that matters. Consider both (and how much cash you have) when looking for the horn that helps you make music.

    Tom
     
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  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Exactly what I was thinking while reading through this thread, Tom.
     
  5. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    how does one know what the sound should be on such old music?
     
  6. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    I agree...it is so, so, so true. I often struggle with 'should I switch up mpcs or find one that works best across my horns for me'.
    But in the end its a player-mpc-horn matchup that works best.

    But I have to throw out another variable....I find that some days/weeks/time periods I just seem to play a certain horn better than another. No question the style of music and sound you want has a lot to do with all this, but sometimes, I sit to play and just cannot get the sound i was getting or want, switch a horn or mpc, and it snaps back in. Anyone else experience this?
     
  7. trumpetguy27

    trumpetguy27 Mezzo Piano User

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    Personally I play (and love) both vintage and new... BUT with that said, I feel like the NEW horns I play aren't THAT different from the vintage stuff. I say this because my new stuff is Adams where they still build each horn by hand and take their time doing so. To me THIS is the biggest difference in vintage vs. modern... the craftsmanship SO to me if a builder still does it the right way (in my humble opinion) they aren't all that different.

    Now if I have to choose between vintage and a new Yammie or Bach etc... vintage ALL day long!

    Just my $.02
     
  8. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Listen to recordings by good bands of the day...:lol:

    Actually, there's not much to guide you other than reading descriptions of how to play in old literature like Arban's, practicing the exercises and melodies in Arban's for technique and style, and playing the tunes pretty much as written in the original music. The instruments have a very mellow sound to begin with, so the sound of the band will be different to people's ears from the start. We frequently get comments to that effect at our concerts.

    Who knows what they really sounded like, though. By studying the methods of the era and playing the original instruments and original music "in a cornet way", I'd guess we come pretty close...intonation quirks and all...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArVNcnvpQy8
     
  9. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    You have just pointed out something else I think is important... careful assembly, or as I think of it, remanufacturing your vintage horn!

    When I had my 1950 Model 228 Lightweight 400 restored by Charlie Melk, in addition to the period style plating, I asked him to replace all of the slide tubes. I also needed to have the valves refit.

    When I received the horn back... I basically now have a brand-new horn with tightly fitted valves and tightly fitted slides. That horn plays so much better than it did before restoration, just because of careful assembly with some minor part replacement. Sure, I spent about $2200 on that horn, but it's gorgeous and plays fabulously, with a hand lapped third slide.

    How much is a new Bach or Schilke run these days? :-)

    The choices, we have so many, and so many good ones. I think it's cause to celebrate.

    Tom
     
  10. Consordino

    Consordino Pianissimo User

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    My thought is that I am holding history in my hands when I play. As you can see by the "valvular friends" listed on my signature, I have a thing for cornets. And, as you so aptly put it, they have a sound unlike the instruments of today. They just don't make 'em like they used to! Dan :-)
     

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