Why is the trumpet world so male dominated?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Trumpetplayer24, Jul 23, 2013.

  1. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    You're
     
  2. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    Ah, he's not pure Aussie, you know, KT. He's a transplant..........just so you have that straight. Don't put so much stock in transplants.
     
  3. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    thank you --- that is three times you have corrected me (3 times is a charm)--- thank you for proving my point!!! -- and that is, someday you would also come over to KT's side, and I would then be on the same level as GM --- and I don't pay you a thing for this service either ---- ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    no because the women are not around -- and then you get away with stuff -- ROFL ROFL ROFL but when they get back from shopping, or work, or whatever women do in their spare time -- then you have to behave!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  5. bamajazzlady

    bamajazzlady Mezzo Forte User

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    To answer your question the simple fact is that society via gender stereotypes assigns the sexes to certain skills, and music is something that while intangible, is made tangible by way of instruments, which can be touched. Girls and women have been taught they are the fairer sex, whereas boys and men have been taught that their power lies in their physicality and assertion of it. What lies in this teaching is that boys and men are drawn to loud noises while girls and women are drawn to more subtle sounds hence why woodwinds are associated with us.
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Don't forget the viola!! ROFL
     
  8. Churchman

    Churchman Mezzo Piano User

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    About 6 months ago I sold a trumpet I had (which wasn't my cup of tea) and it was purchased by a man in France for his grand-daughter, here in the same town as I live in. She was, at that point, self-taught, and about 9 years old. She was also extremely good. Girlies who get into 'men-things' like trumpet playing often seem to excel at them, maybe because they have to try a bit harder in order to be accepted.

    A more interesting question would be when did you last see a school concert with a male flute-player? And if you have, why was he doing it? ROFL
     
  9. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    In addition to bama's explaination, it is important to look at the question in a historical perspective. Women were 2nd maybe 3rd class citizens for a long time in America and in some countries, they continue to be placed by society in those roles. If its any consolation, those countries that treat women on equal footing with men, are the most advanced countries but that's food for another story.
    Back to the question:
    Throughout time, the role of the average female was (for the most part) not permitted in the limelight. In fact, once upon a time, all actors on the stage were male. Female characters were played by men. Imagine for a second how many women played in the orchestras back during Beethoven's time? That number would be close to "zero".
    Women were shunned for taking on what was considered a man's position. To do so could be down right dangerous!!
    They could be ostrasized by their family and society, placed in a mental institution (back then, it didn't take a lot to be admitted to an asylum) beaten or murdered.
    In America, some of this instrumental choice based on sex still exists. Back in the 1960's a person would be hard pressed to find girls playing brass in America. Girls played flute or clarinet back then.
    There was once a belief that for a woman to do some of the things a man did, it would result in physical harm to their reproductive system.
    It wasn't too long ago when women fought to get the vote in America and it's an ongoing battle for women to get equal pay for equal work.
    Today, band directors trained by men who embraced the idea of instrument choice based on sex, are still very much alive and active.
    To be female in America is a challenge. In fact, to live in America and have some jackass band director to say "Honey, I think you'd be better off on flute or clarinet" and to give in to that directive would be considered by many (including myself) as patently unAmerican.
    So why does there seem to be more men than women in brass? Societal change is a road that takes quite a while to build and it's often paved in pain or as Carl Jung would say: "There is no birth on conciousness without pain".
    Hope this helps answer at least one facet of this multifaceted question.
    Dr.Mark
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2013
  10. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    I'll have to think about it. You are worthy of an editor, for the volume of work it would require, that is.
     

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