Why Lawler?

Discussion in 'Horns' started by bigaggietrumpet, Jan 23, 2004.

  1. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    I am currently looking for a new concert horn. It needs to have a very full warm sound. Currently, I am leaning towards a Schilke, but because I really don't know all that much about Lawler, if someone could, please tell me all the pros and cons.
     
  2. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Sounds to me like you are willing to spend some money and get a great horn. Speak to Bruce Lee about an Eclipse! Check their webpage and read through their bell descriptions.
     
  3. Bruce Lee

    Bruce Lee Piano User

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    Oct 24, 2003
    Rochester, NY
    Lawler trumpets are well known for their great response and intonation, as well as for their ability to blend very well with other manufacturer's horns. Stress-free bracing is used in the design, which contributes greatly to the quick response. In combination with a well-designed bell, and an efficient leadpipe that is balanced to the bell, the great slotting, and responsiveness allows the player to produce the sound that he/she desires.

    Getzen valves, considered to be an outstanding within the industry, are now featured on all Lawler trumpets. The Lifetime Getzen Warranty has also been extended to the Lawler valve sections.

    Additionally, because the horns are custom-built to the player, you have a choice of bell/leadpipe options, and finish, as well as customizations such as finger rings or hooks, and water keys.

    For more information regarding model choices, ordering, or current build time, etc., please feel free to contact me off-board, via e-mail, or PM. Thank you!

    Best always,
    Bruce
     
  4. Lawler Bb

    Lawler Bb Piano User

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    65
    Oct 25, 2003
    Milwaukee, WI
    Roy Lawler makes one of the finest trumpets on the market today. They can be custom made to your liking out of a wide variety of bell and leadpipe options. Roy and Bruce can certainly expand on this more, but I personally have not found a finer playing trumpet than my Lawler. I have played Blackburns and Monettes, and don't find them to be better than my Lawler. The workmanship on my Lawler is amazing and what a sound. Now having said that, my horn has a commercially-oriented sound, so that is where my perspective is from. I can go into more details if need be.

    Make sure you play many different horns before you buy. For me, Schilkes are too bright and thin sounding for symphonic playing, YMMV.
     
  5. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

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    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    Anyone leaning toward Schilke should consider Callet Jazz, Yamaha Z, V-Raptor and Selmer Paris. Those horns are closer to Schilke in response than the typical Lawler (he can custom build to suit your needs, thus that's one big reason to consider him). They're all great horns, so long as you select one to suit your needs.

    Dave
     
  6. bkmdano

    bkmdano New Friend

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    Nov 13, 2003
    I've been thinking on how to respond to this thread. Since I owned and played a Schilke B5 for 6 years. I had Roy build a Lawler TL6r-1a after playing one at Bruce's Florida trumpet fest. I personally found the blow of the Lawler similar to my Schilke. Roy confirmed that many Schilke players have turned to Lawler due to the similarity in blow. I found that the Lawler is a little more open and responsive. The response became even better after I had Roy convert it to an sts model. This allows me to use the 6r bell or a 24 bell which blends well with Strads. The slotting on the Lawler is much better than my B5. I don't have the problems above high C as I did before. All this being said, I don't have to work as hard on the Lawler. It is the finest trumpet I have ever played.

    Everyone has their own opinion and characteristics they are looking for. But I'm very happy and satisfied with my Lawler.
     
  7. knf jazz cat

    knf jazz cat New Friend

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    Dec 16, 2003
    I'd say if you want a horn with a very warm sound, definitely look at the Callet Jazz/Symphonique. I have one and I love it, it's a very versatile horn; from lead playing to soloing in a jazz group to classical, the Callet can do it all excellently.
     
  8. Bruce Lee

    Bruce Lee Piano User

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    Oct 24, 2003
    Rochester, NY
    Hey, Dave!

    I'm not understanding your meaning here, when you speak about a "typical" Lawler.

    I've spent a significant amount of time playing a Callet Jazz, and might compare that more to a Schilke X3, with better slotting in the upper register. As for the other horns, they would bring to mind the Schilke B7, or B5... maybe even an X3L.

    Since there are several models of Lawler trumpets available, I think that there are some great choices/options available to meet the individual player's needs... for a "typical" day of trumpet playing! :wink:

    Best always,
    Bruce
     
  9. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    Well, bigaggie hasn't told us which Schilke he likes, but I haven't heard which Lawler compares to a Schilke. I have only played a few, but they all reminded me more of Bachs. I haven't tried the Martin repros, but those certainly shouldn't remind one of a Schilke. So, which Lawler reminds you of a B1 or X3?

    Dave
     
  10. Bruce Lee

    Bruce Lee Piano User

    450
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    Oct 24, 2003
    Rochester, NY
    Hey, Dave!

    You're right... we haven't heard which model bigaggie likes. In a PM, I suggested the TL6R-1A as the Lawler model which closely meets the playing characteristics that he has described.

    As for which model is more like the Schilke X3, I would say that the TL6L-1 is pretty close, from a "feel", and sound perspective. For the B1, I would lean toward the TL6-1A. The missing ingredient is the player, and the mouthpiece(s) that he/she uses, comfortably, for the best balance.

    As far as the model that more closely relates to Bach, I would assume that you are speaking about the Bach 37. The TL1-1A would fit that description. Despite the fact that it isn't listed on Roy's site doesn't mean that it can't be made, as was mentioned in another thread.

    I hope that this helps!

    Best always,
    Bruce
     

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