Why the 3rd valve slide?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by hhsTrumpet, May 10, 2012.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I use them both - single or in combination. The valves that I push next determine what I prefer. To be honest, I never "think" about it. I just do it. Playing on the resonant center of a note simply sounds better and is less work!
     
  2. duanemassey

    duanemassey Piano User

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    I don't use either one. I just blame it on the guy next to me...
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I use the third valve slide to enhance intonation. When I use is when I believe a passage is slow enough that the ear will be able to detect the difference in intonation between when the valve is extended vs. when it is left closed. With my Olds Recording, this is so easy to use as the trigger is ingaged in an instant with immediate response and just as quick release.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    With that said: Miles Davis is pictured many times without the third valve ring on his Committee. Check out the link below, and scroll half way down. Not only is Miles not using the third valve ring, but he has it in the horn going in the opposite direction. There are several pictures I have seen of Miles doing this with the ring, kind of his statement as to the importace of using the ring. Not having it did not negatively impact on his tone in the lower register I would say as a biased observer.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think with the amount of coolness in each of Miles notes, things like tone and intonation become secondary. If Miles would have come to TM he probably would have sold his Committee.
     
  6. Steve Hollahan

    Steve Hollahan Pianissimo User

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    Most early trumpets, even pro models only had a 3rd slide ring. Just did a 31XXX serial number Bach Strad w/ no 1st valve saddle. Lots of early trumpets and cornets lacked even 3rd ring. For many of us older players, 3rd slide was our only option. Using a saddle was new to me in college. However, now I can't live w/o one. Use both 1st saddle and third ring constantly now. I don't like triggers, though I have had them.
     
  7. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    I like triuggers but because of where I put my right thumb it won't work.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Naahhh... If Miles came to TM he would have sent it to Tom Green or Charlie Melk to have it refurbished.
     
  9. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    Since Miles never had to pay for a Committee, since he was their principal endorser, he would have sold at least one per year!
    BTW, Pictures of Conrad, show him with no 3rd or 1st valve trigger. Even his personalized Gozzo Leblanc, that I possess does not have one.
    I also recently acquired Bernie Privin's 1933 Besson Brevette, and it doesn't have any either.
    The greats use their embouchure!
     
  10. joe1joey

    joe1joey Piano User

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    Some say that as the ranks swelled over the years, so did the delivery of horns that demanded less of the lip. Horns that were almost entirely in tune with themselves became 'outdated' and replaced with horns of all caliber inclusive of amending slides. Certainly a smart mass production marketing technology. It didn't eliminate any artists, and allowed the development of many more decent players while reducing research/production costs immeasurably. Just a bandied about idea... . As to Miles Davis, a genius that played on instruments that can bend notes either side of, or dead on center; I can see no pride or foolishness issue in neglecting a slide's use there.
     
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