Why upgrade?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by LLD, Nov 20, 2007.

  1. LLD

    LLD New Friend

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    So, in one of my previous threads, and through reading here and common sense, a new trumpet isn't going to revolutionize my sound or make me any better.

    Begging the question, what reasons are there to upgrade?

    The Stage 1 (especially Bb California and Model H, IMO) are beautiful horns, and I'd like to justify a replacement for my Strad, but that's a big purchase if it's not going to change much...
     
  2. camelbrass

    camelbrass Mezzo Forte User

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    I think that one of the things that makes us keep looking is that there is always a chance that you'll try something that will fit you better. That magic pill that lets you do everything that bit easier and matches that sound in your head, isn't there? With all the choice there has to be at least one perfect horn 'waiting' for us to play it. It's a bit like the arguement that says that if the universe is infinite there must be other civilisations just like ours waiting to be discovered. It's perfect logic, isn't it?

    Save for a defective trumpet mechanically or physically, once you've reached a certain level of instrument, the differences in my experience are minimal and to be honest most improvements haven't warranted me to change (yet). Chris Martin writes in his latest article that after going through all sorts of instrument changes he is back to the Bachs he has always played.

    Just my thoughts.

    Regards,


    Trevor


    PS Though I'm sure I'd look really good with a gold plated balckburn or a Monette P1!!
     
  3. Adam Smith

    Adam Smith Pianissimo User

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    A horn wont revolutionize your sound, but it will change it. You dont want to play a 3 lb taylor for lead in a jazz band. A horn wont make you physically any better at trumpet, but it can help you play better if it is a better playing horn. You might not have to fight to play in tune, the upper register might be more open and easy, it might play more centered and slot better. Heck, it might even inspire you to practice a bit more. I think going from a strad to a stage 1 is going to change more than you think. I think it would be justified simply because you know you are going to be satisfied. You are going to get a horn that is just right for you. You are not just going to order a stock model, get it, and thats the end of that. Talk to some of the guys that have stage 1,s. I know at lest 2 have just recently received their horns from felix. Bach's are great horns (mostly), they have the sound, but there is another level of horn.
     
  4. DubbaCTrumpetMSU

    DubbaCTrumpetMSU Mezzo Piano User

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    Adam is right. I am one of the two that just received my Stage 1 California a while ago. I can honestly say that it changed things. Tuning, the high stuff...just the sound itself. There is a difference. Whether it's worth it to upgrade, well, that's up to you. I for one just did, and I couldn't be happier. Talk about motivation to practice...

    Russ
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    A new trumpet can be like a new girl or boyfriend. The warm fuzzies every time that you meet! Exploring depths of your being (good and bad) that you never knew were there before. Constant discovery of new things about your playing. After the intitial "rush" wears off, you have a stable, predictable partner for the rest of your life (or until the next one comes into your life....).
    For the player that can tear down the brick wall of "hardware considerations", it is a new motivation to move forward.

    If you are more of the laid back techy type, a new horn is just hardware that you need to get used to. If excitement and passion are part of your life, there is a big world out there!
     
  6. camelbrass

    camelbrass Mezzo Forte User

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    Robin,

    You make me sound like a passionless technocrat. Good call...am I really that transparent?


    Regards,


    Trevor
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Trevor,
    you have more passion than you care to admit!

    If a Bach fits like an old shoe and does what you need it to, why switch - other than for featured artist status and maybe some marketing money!

    On the other hand, if you are looking to stretch the envelope, the trumpet is currently in a state of redefinition: not only with Monette's Elysian but on the less massive side: Felixes Stage 1 New York7! The possibilities are almost infinite, if WE are willing to let go of prejudices and copycat mentalities!

    For the rest of us, we often get swamped in the technobabble and forget that making music is an art driven by passion, entertainment is a business driven by money and a trumpet is needed for both and there is a certain amount of crossover! PASSION and personality is the difference between good and great.

    Bud Herseth also tried a Monette and went back to his Bach. Not because the Monette was worse, but the sound did not fit in his head/situation. Chris Martin "tried" other horns and is now also back with his Bach for whatever reason. I do not read this as "inflexible", a question of competence or even as a lost opportunity. Bach HAS a distinctive character and that is for many players the most transparent window for their musicality! I am just happy that in the trumpet world, there are instruments that offer REAL variety and players willing to paint with new colors!
     
  8. camelbrass

    camelbrass Mezzo Forte User

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    Amen Robin
     
  9. confuoco

    confuoco Pianissimo User

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    Nice post!

     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I have a pair of Royal Robbins climbing shoes--uncomfortable canvas and rubber things that were state of the art when I bought them 25 years ago. When I pulled them out for a day of climbing four years ago, other climbers chuckled (it turned to laughter when they saw me climb). I probably wouldn't have climbed any better with newer high-tech shoes, but they probably wouldn't have climbed as comfortably with a pair of Royal Robbins.

    Bach was state of the art at one time. They aren't now. This does not make them bad, but there are some horns out there worth trying, and it makes for an interesting day, trying out new horns.
     

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