Wilbur Harden and the Mystery of the 1958 Kuhlohorn

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Honkie, Jul 22, 2014.

  1. Honkie

    Honkie Pianissimo User

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    Here's the mystery:

    [​IMG]

    Wilbur Harden (1925-1969) was, and is, an under-appreciated player. He recorded with John Coltrane and Yusef Lateef in 1957-58,
    before retiring from music in 1960, due to poor health. He recorded four albums as leader, with Coltrane appearing on three.

    He is acknowledged to be one of the first to use the flugelhorn in jazz. In the above photo, he's playing a rotary -- very strange for a jazz player
    to be playing a rotary in the 1950s!

    Here's my question: is the horn pictured a flugelhorn -- is it perhaps the even-rarer kuhlohorn?
    And...how weird is that?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITGPKGZPIQE
     

    Attached Files:

  2. bamajazzlady

    bamajazzlady Mezzo Forte User

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    It's a kuhlohorn.
     
  3. Honkie

    Honkie Pianissimo User

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    OK!
    Kuhlohorn it is.

    So the here's the mystery: how does Wilbur Harden, from Birmingham, Alabama,
    wind up playing the kuhlohorn, an instrument virtually unknown outside of Germany?

    (Especially since at that time, even the flugelhorn had not yet become popular in jazz.)

    I don't have an answer.
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    A fair number of instruments were "liberated" from Germany at the end of WWII.
     
  5. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Actually, the Kuhlohorn had a fair following in the US - in Lutheran parishes of German extraction who brought their tradition and their instruments with them when emigrating in the hectic phase before WWI. Many of these parishes were located in poorer districts, and the parishioners came into close contact with other low-status groups in American society, amongst them - African Americans. The instruments - some of them even made in the US by emigrated German makers - found their way around.
     
  6. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Just found out that 1950-56, Wilbur Harden served in the US Navy and in the course of that service, spent long periods abroad and in German naval bases. Perhaps the contact with the Kuhlohorn was made there.
     
  7. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Actually, Wilbur Harden's name was spelt "Hardin" on the cover of at least one Coltrane LP... perhaps that can confuse some search engines...
     
  8. robrtx

    robrtx Mezzo Forte User

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    I always thought Kuhlohorn was Spanish for "a&&" horn.

    That explains the funny looks I got the time I tried to play one.........:-?
     
  9. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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  10. robrtx

    robrtx Mezzo Forte User

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    Of course, and my apologies if I offended, just an off-handed attempt at humor.
     

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