Will piccolo trumpets keep its place in Baroque literature?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by _TrumpeT_, Aug 5, 2006.

  1. _TrumpeT_

    _TrumpeT_ Piano User

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    There are so many trumpeters who can play baroque trumpets these days. Do you think there will be a day when Baroque literature (not just HIP) will be mainly performed on baroque trumpets?
     
  2. davidjohnson

    davidjohnson Piano User

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    no, i do not think that.

    dj
     
  3. gtromble

    gtromble Pianissimo User

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    The piccolo trumpet repertoire goes far beyond baroque trumpet (music written for the trumpet back in the day). The facility of the pic in performing transcribed works originally for violin, oboe, etc gives it its own niche -- and you won't see those works being performed on natural or baroque trumpets. I like seeing the traditional baroque trumpet pieces performed on the valveless horns, but I agree with the previous poster that they won't 'replace' the pic for performing them -- and there's a lot more that the pic can do.

    GT
     
  4. _TrumpeT_

    _TrumpeT_ Piano User

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    Apr 26, 2006
    Yes I know that piccolo trumpets can play more than traditional baroque trumpet parts. What I meant to say was whether the baroque trumpets will replace the piccolo trumpets in TRUMPET parts. Of course I know that piccolo are great for transcribed and certain orchestral works and even pop works such as "Penny Lane"
     
  5. davidjohnson

    davidjohnson Piano User

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    still, the answer is 'no'.

    dj
     
  6. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    No...I don't see that happening either. The picc has a much different sound than the baroque natural trumpets do. It's a color we have in our spectrum that Bach, Handel et al did not have.
     
  7. Tromba1030

    Tromba1030 Pianissimo User

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    I sure hope it sticks around or else i just blew a lot of money on my P5-4 :cry:

    -Jacob
     
  8. mattdalton

    mattdalton Pianissimo User

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    I'm one of those baroque trumpet players, and while I think that more people will play baroque trumpet over time, I still think that modern piccolo trumpets will dominate. A major component of this is outside the trumpet domain, in that there would have to be a major shift toward more period instrument orchestras/ensembles to create the demand.
     
  9. Clarino

    Clarino Mezzo Piano User

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    I think Picc will remain the weapon of choice for most Baroque trumpet playing for the forseeable futuer, partly because it is more reliable and easier to play in tune than a Nat. Plus you are less likely to split a note on the Picc. That's not to say that Picc makes it easy or that mediocre players can tackle the parts, but even the greats struggle to make the Nat sound as good as audiences demand. Personally, I think the Picc gets us closer to what the composer had in mind when the parts were written than a Nat does. Composers frequently demand more from their players than what is immediately possible. I really believe that the Picc is positive progress for the trumpet.
     
  10. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Forte User

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    When conductors start requiring natural trumpets instead of piccolo trumpets, that will be the time when the piccolo has had its day.

    Personally, I don't see that happening for some considerable time, if at all - there will always be the historically informed performance groups, where natural/baroque trumpets are used, but for the majority of conductors (and groups) I would suggest that they are looking for a sound that will work alongside the modern strings and woodwind, rather than the timbre of what might be termed the "authentic" sound.

    Saying that, I also think that most trumpeters who wish to perform baroque works will soon be able to use both instruments. There will be those who specialise on one or the other, but versatility will get you more gigs, so it pays to be able to play anything on anything.
     

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