Will switching horns help long run?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by TrumpetMonk, Aug 28, 2009.

  1. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Nov 19, 2003
    Brooklyn,NY
    Hmmmmmmm!
    When I was doing "Jerome Robbins Broadway," I was ask to train a singer to play trumpet for a tune from "Gypsy." I went to Sam Ash and tried student model trumpets.
    I tried just about every brand of student horn they had. They all had all the notes on them. Some blew terribly and had questionable pitch. None of the horns were impossible to play. I picked Yamahas.......My student won a Tony:cool:

    A student does not need a top of the line horn to progress. Good instruction and a will to improve are much more important than a shiny horn.
    You can sound fantastic on a less than great horn.
    Wilmer
     
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  2. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    Indeed -- but a less than great horn will eventually hold a person back. It's possible to get to a point where you just can't improve on a particular horn. Shiny has nothing to do with it -- internal construction has everything.

    your student may have won a Tony (congratulations!) but could she have played the Haydn with the NYPhil on that trumpet? There's a reason Phil Smith isn't playing a Yamaha student trumpet on the job, and it's not just appearance.
     
  3. Liblip

    Liblip New Friend

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    Mar 29, 2008
    I still love my old student horn, but acknowledge that it doesn't "sing" like my main axe. It's conventional wisdom that a pro will sound like one on any instrument, and a schlub will sound like a schlub on the finest crafted horn available. For me it goes to ease of use.

    The man who runs trumpetgearhead.com relates a story of seeing a fine performance in New Orleans on an Ambassador. He wondered at what point that horn might hold that performer "back." I would consider that experience for the player to be "clankier" and a bit more arduous, but still within the realm of being accomplished. -Ed
     
  4. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.

    Wilmer,

    I thought you just bought a new trumpet or at least you were looking.
    Why were you looking for a new one if the old one was doing the job?
     
  5. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Brooklyn,NY
    Yes, I could play the Haydn on that horn.......so could Phil. For a very long time as a student my instrument was a lot less than perfect, but I played it. The horn can make playing easier, but only if you can play in the first place.
    The magic is NOT in the horn. You make the music!
    Wilmer
     
  6. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Brooklyn,NY
    I am a professional player. My question was for the student who thinks that the horn makes for better playing. I played the Bach 72* for more than 35 years.......it was time for a rest for that horn. It is STILL a very, very fine horn.
    Equipment is not always the answer, though on the internet one might get the impression that it is.
    Wilmer
     
  7. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.

    Equipment is not alwayse the answer, but it can be.

    I started on an old cornet that my father had. I don't know where it came from or what kind it was. It had solder from my father fixing it all over the place. (He wasn't a repair man) I think it leaked and was just in really rough shape. I played it for a couple of years before getting my first trumpet. I still believe to this day that that cornet held me back. I had instant improvement when I got the trumpet.
     
  8. TrumpetMonk

    TrumpetMonk Pianissimo User

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    Jul 22, 2009
    West virginia
    There's a lot of good advice from this thread. I'm not going to use my strad to march, one guy already got pegged by one of the flag girls. If I practice with my Strad 43 though and I get better, It'll show through on the blessing right? Maybe it's a dumb question but I don't want to do something that won't be good for my playing.
     
  9. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Brooklyn,NY
    Things have gotten cloudy.
    A Blessing trumpet vs a Strad was the initial question. I maintain that a student instrument should not hold a player back, or that a pro horn will make a student a better player.
    Wilmer
     
  10. EdMann

    EdMann Mezzo Forte User

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    Sep 20, 2007
    Los Angeles
    You will get stares of incredulity from the old pros here in LA when given the option of playing a Monette vs. say, an Olds Ambassador. "It's the player, not the horn." Now from the younger pros, many swear by the their equipment to give them the sound they want, a refining if you will, of what they hear in their heads. Even so, these horns, such as Shew's Yamaha and Lee Thornberg's new Orlando horn are way under 2K.

    I ran into Sam Ash when last in NY and played most everything on the wall, and some of the student horns were fine, but only some of them. The pro horns were all wonderful.
     

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