Wind Ensemble

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by schleiman, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. schleiman

    schleiman Piano User

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    Well, I've now been to 2 wind ensemble rehearsals and I am learning so much it is amazing. Having never played in a group like this before other than 6th grade for a few months, I feel like I'm discovering a whole new world. And as an added bonus, I've found someone in the trumpet section who is not only willing, but excited to come over and play duets with me once a week as well. We had our first session last night and it's amazing how much it helps with sight reading just going through the Arbans. Just an update really, hope everyone is doing well!
     
  2. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    That's really cool. Doing it with others is a lot more fun than just with yourself. Well, playing alone has it's value, too, but you put it together when you do it with others. Then, of course, it culminates when there are listeners. Are you playing with these guys? Austin Civic Wind Ensemble How long did you say you've been playing? That's a hell of a program.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    That, Evan is what this is all about. Getting out and doing something with the talents that we have been given as gifts.

    In the music world 1+1 is definitely more than 2!
     
  4. schleiman

    schleiman Piano User

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    Yeah that's them! It's quite a bit larger than I expected as well, we have around 70 members give or take a few stragglers. I've been playing just over a year, and yes it is a hell of a program. Carmina is absolutely gorgeous. I've been listening to the LSO version for inspiration there. Then there is a piece which I love called Allerseelen by Strauss. The moments, the swells the lulls, the soaring chords, are just ear candy from where I sit in the section. And thank you I believe it was you who steered me towards the group in the first place, I really appreciate that. I'm really having fun playing. And Rowuk, thanks for the kind words.

     
  5. larry tscharner

    larry tscharner Forte User

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    So you discovered one of the best kept secrets in music. Being part of something very much larger than you could ever do yourself...its almost spiritual...oh, I guess it is spiritual. Be ware though, you may sit next to someone more advanced than you and learn things by leaps and bounds. Thats just the tip of the iceberg, the fun factor is amplified 10 times in a group! Hang on and enjoy the ride. Best wishes.
     
  6. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Evan, what a coincicence. As I sat down and opened up this forum thread, I had Allerseelen by the great German singer Hermann Prey playing. If you would like to hear where the original music comes from this is one version of the original art song by Strauss. It was not a longer instrumental like the band arrangement. Give a listen if you like. Oh BTW forum members. Evan is a much stronger player than I was expecting considering how little a time he's been playing. Good on ye my lad. ;-) Allerseelen - YouTube
     
  7. schleiman

    schleiman Piano User

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    Thanks! I'm working hard on getting better. And now it is a lot of fun, and there are reasons to work on certain techniques besides just wanting to be better at them. The piu mosso section of Fortune plango vulnera requires good finger dexterity and familiarity with the intervals, so I've been drilling Clarke and Schlossberg for those. And the sixth movement "Were diu werlt alle min", requires quick double tounging, so I've been hitting the Arban's there. I'm trying to approach it with a plan, which is mainly concentrate on what's difficult for me, and just skim on the parts I find easy. We only have around 8 more rehearsals until our performance in late October, so I am a bit nervous. But I'm very focused now. I have a goal : to play the concert the absolute best that I can for the audience. I will keep you all updated on developments or snags as they pop up.
     
  8. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    Typically, wind ensembles are 1 on a part for brass and are usually no more than 30 players in total. Concert bands are generally 40 or more.
    In a wind ensemble I play in, we have 4 to 6 trumpets, 3 trombones, 1 or 2 tubas, 1 extraordinary euphonium player,
    4 horns, 2-3 saxes, 6-8 clarinets, 3 flutes with one on piccolo, 1 or 2 oboes, 1 bassoon, and 3 percussionists.
    Over the years, this band has produced some of Chicago's top players. Some have gone on to Broadway, the Chicago Symphony, the Lyric Opera orchestra, the National Symphony, and others. It is not open to everyone and you must be invited to perform in it. Some folks do not get invited back.
    In today's band we have past members of the Chicago Symphony, music teachers, and local pros.
    Rich T.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2011
  9. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Rich, I've seen the term Wind Ensemble and Band used interchangeably a lot over the years, but you're right that in the original sense, at least in my mind, a wind ensemble is based on Fennell's original concept, although the word "ensemble" itself, really does not imply size, only a group. I don't think anyone can agree on what size a band is though, considering the history and tradition of bands worldwide. Seems to me it's more defined by what their repertoire and function is than by anything else.

    The group Evan plays in has grown in size considerably. I started in it as one of three alto saxophonists. Then the sax section exploded in size so I moved to the four person horn section. It's now, sometimes, six and the overall size of the band is now definitely what one would call concert band size. But the organisation has a long established (1975) name - Austin Civic Wind Ensemble - and it wouldn't make sense to change the it now, regardless of size. Gotta keep the public happy, you know. ;-)
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2011
  10. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    I see your point. I have a tendency to not see gray areas and stick to rigid parameters. That's not always the correct way to look at things.
    This goes back to high school days when Fennel's group was considered a true "wind ensemble" and when we would cut our 100 member band down, it was referred to as the "Fenton Wind Ensemble" and not the Concert Band. There were usually just 40 of us from the 100.
    Believe it or not, the band I mentioned in the first post has sometimes as many as 10 of us from Fenton High School and some of us go back to the late 60s. The director of the band was our high school band director! He is still going strong in his 70s and began teaching at the school at age 21 in 1958. He retired in 2003.
    A bit off topic, but I suppose worth mentioning.
    Rich T.
     

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