Work Work Work

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ricecakes230, Aug 17, 2013.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I use this book as well, but after I had already developed my range... which I got from practicing traditional methods and slurring up on octave AND experiences I gleaned by working as a lead player in the big band. Experience with lead charts did the most to develop my range. Perhaps some needs to design a lesson book that is a compilation of traditional lead band materials.
     
  2. jellesmiecht

    jellesmiecht New Friend

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    You can try Maynard Ferguson his 'method' too, he says in an interview that he likes to play songs like chorals and stuff. Then transpose them (he does them a minor third higher) everytime you can play the previous run as musical and beautiful as you played it in the original key.

    Especially with chorals and ballads this will build your endurance enormously (when taking enough rest and you don't overpractice~!) and you will build usable range.

    Maynard Ferguson Clinic: 07. Q&A-How to Increase Range - YouTube

    Maynard his words: "You don't own any note in the upper register, unless you can play it romantically."
     
  3. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    What do you mean when you say "when it sounds like you're playing high, you aren't doing it right."
     
  4. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    This sounds like a great endurance exercise. I like how it sounds but I'm just curious to know if it will help me strengthen my upper register, as well as exploring a few new notes maybe?
     
  5. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    This is probably a simplistic view but the logic appeals to me

    1) You can't achieve note X by practising note X because you cannot achieve note X
    2) You can just about achieve note X-1, but playing note X-1 kills your lip instantly
    3) You are proficient at achieving note X-2, but lack the endurance to practise note X-2 without killing your lip quickly
    4) Killing your lip is a bad thing
    5) Practise no higher than note X-3 until you gain the endurance to practise at note X-2
    6) Be patient - it'll come
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2013
  6. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    I never.. oh my goodness. The amount of sense.. I love it. Thank you
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    We were once told by my director individually to play "solo" when I practiced, and I thought at the time it was ridiculous as who else was going to practice with me. Much later I finally realized he had said "so low". Now I realize it takes less effort to play low and by this I mean pianissimo vis ffff and slowly vis largo An additional effect is that I found after doing this was that I could get a purer tone doing so. Over time, too, I recognized my endurance was extended. Why I find I second line G the easiest to start with, I've no explanation, but from that note I start my slurs up a note and back to G, then I slur up two notes and slur back to G, three notes and back etc. etc. Then I restart the process slurring downward. When I finish that, I start my chromatic scales from G downward as far as I can go and then ascending as high as I can go repeating such again faster and faster as fast as I can. Looking back in time, I was able to play Entry of the Gladiators before I was out of high school and again in my comeback subsequently in my comeback have played Flight Of The Bumblebee in less than a minute. Can I play these songs now, I'll only say maybe ... and try, perhaps low and slow at first and second pass ... then ??? Hey, I'm getting old and beginning to feel it.
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    a lot of the higher range -- can be summed up in the recipe ::: ADD MORE AIR, FASTER AIR, OR SOME KIND OF AIR!! --- but yeah, by practicing in the staff, you are strengthening your embouchure with "much easier" notes to play well. This can be (more or less) extrapolated into the high register -- simply by ADDING AIR. ---- in whatever range you have, try this with octave leaps!!! -- don't change your embouchure, but use your stomach muscles (AIR) to change registers!!, ---- but yeah, long notes in the staff will do wonders for your high range embouchure!!!!!
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    C-D-E-G-C-G-E-G-C in 4/4, play each note as an eighth note until the last and hold it four beats. Move up a half tone and repeat with no rest. Do this as high as you can until you reach your limit. The goal is to be comfortable from C to C. This is a Walter Moeck routine and it's effective.
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Please understand... Long tones are best used for warming up, not building range. Long tones may in fact destroy range if over used. Cat Anderson's book does use long tones, for warm up. He uses phrasing and slurring exercises for range building. Alan Vizzutti in a Master Trumpet class I attended supported this as saying long tones run the risk of being over done, and can lead to tiring the embouchure if over used. Please do not think that long tones will build range. They will only warm you up to exercises that will build range.
     

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