Working out rhythms

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mamboman, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    No, please don't! Nothing worse than playing on a stage with people tapping their feet. Most of them won't be in time and rarely in time with the conductor.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    From your perspective, it sound like the OP who states: "The reason is because I can’t work out rhythms. Most kids I know, when they tried to play for the first time, they could just work them out," seems not to be alone! Also brings to mind "...following the beat of a different drummer".

    Your commentary however is sobering. Communication is all about harmonizing and getting rhythms to blend; not necessarily to be in the same time, but to blend. Mingus was a genius at doing this: Example "Girl of My Dreams" where the soloist and meter is written and played with in a 4/4 swing while the rhythm section is laying down 6/8: But they ARE together.

    I am sorry to hear the individuals you hear on stage have not found this art of communicating rhythm. This only suggests they need to practice MORE with their feet, rather than stop altogether. Maybe they need to use their feet and learn the rhythms or African brothers have taught us in the original American art form we know as jazz. To play jazz is to learn and understand rhythm.
     
  3. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    Oh Jazz.......................... Oh yes stamp your feet all you like, no one will hear it above the screamers. ROFL

    I was refering more to proper music. :roll:
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Proper music has much to learn from jazz. We American colonists can still give something back to the Monarchs for all the support they had given us to develop our independence. AND once the "proper" musicians then learn to play in rhythm, perhaps placing a little carpeting on the stage may dampen the coordinated rhythmic thump of multiple feet tapping in unison.
     
  5. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    No wonder my first night at the community band practice was a rhythmic disaster --- they don't play Jazz!!!!!!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  6. Mamboman

    Mamboman Pianissimo User

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    ... So most of you guys just picked this up after trying to work out rhythms over and over again?
     
  7. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    I was always told to sub divide the bars into smaller units and to count them in my head. Still can't do it very well, but the more you play the more you'll see new rhythms. Then you'll hear others playing them and know how they go. So one day, someone will stick some music in front of you and you'll recognise the rhythm from somewhere.

    Don't listen to the Jazzers, they just make it up as they play. :cool:
     
  8. lemonzown

    lemonzown New Friend

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    i would just write in the downboats (or upbeats depending on the rythm) for each bacause if you dont know where the downbeat is, you can get totally screwed.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Isn't this the essence of practice? Assuming you do it wisely (not brainless practice as is often quoted by our mentor the great and wonderful rowuk). Yes HEAR the rhythm as it was intended and play it over and over again. It's pulse WILL become your heart beat. Check out the name of our band's CD: Bass Notes, The Heart Beat of Jazz. We emulate what we play.

    Eddie Brookshire Quintet
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Click... Click...

    BANG!!

    Before we were jazzers, we were classicers that finally learned how to get it right!
     

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