Working the young ones!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Rick14A4A, Dec 31, 2010.

  1. Rick14A4A

    Rick14A4A New Friend

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    Jul 29, 2008
    Texas
    Just got back from Boy Scout camp where the Bugling merit badge was offered. I wasn't teaching the class but wished I had been available to help more. The person teaching the class was very knowledgeable musician but had never been exposed to the trumpet or bugle. I was there for the last class and offered my help with the kids passing off their required calls. I found an array of abilities from never picked up a horn to high school band students. Most were Jr high or Middle Schoolers. This is a walk before you run type situation and I spent what little time we had on tone. What good is halfway playing a call if you can't stand to be heard due to bad tone.

    Now my question to the experts here is, how do you properly explain obtaining good tone to a young player where they recognized the difference? Not sure whether I'm approaching it the proper way or not. I get results but it is extremely difficult to explain and thinking someone with this experience with young players may have a simpler method of this.
     
  2. SteveB

    SteveB Mezzo Piano User

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    Probably the best way is to demonstrate an (exaggerated) sample of both a bad tone and a good one. Youngsters, even those with no prior musical experience, typically have a keen sense for distinguishing what is pleasing to the ear and what isn't.

    (You can't become good until you first know what bad is.)

    Once they have a "role model" sound for quality, they'll be equipped with a mental goal as to what a bugle/trumpet should sound like when played properly. From there, it's a matter of teaching them the proper techniques and skills to potentially achieve that sound/tone.
     
  3. beneharris

    beneharris New Friend

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    Dec 28, 2010
    i think that is good advice
     
  4. larry tscharner

    larry tscharner Forte User

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    +1 A great teaching technique is a christal clear example. Good luck.
     
  5. Rick14A4A

    Rick14A4A New Friend

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    Jul 29, 2008
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    I was basically working on proper air flow, posture, and horn position. Many of the young ones do not put enough air into a horn to achieve a quality sound.

    I'm not familiar with the Christal Clear method. Where can I learn more about this?

    Thanks for the feedback!
     
  6. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    rick asks:
    Now my question to the experts here is, how do you properly explain obtaining good tone to a young player where they recognized the difference?
    --
    Great question Rick.
    Here's what to do.
    >Play a long tone.
    >Slowly bend the note up and down while staying on the same note
    >While doing this, listen and feel.
    >Listen for the point (somewhere in the bend) where the bugle's sound will brighten up and seem to be louder.
    >Feel for the point (somewhere in the bend) where the bugle will vibrate more in your hands.
    Those two points will be about the same. When the horn brightens up and the horn seems to vibrate more in your hands is where you want to be.
    Hope this helps
     
  7. Rick14A4A

    Rick14A4A New Friend

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    Jul 29, 2008
    Texas
    Thanks Markie, I made them play 2nd line G and hold the long tone but I didn't think about the bending of the note to find the pitch. Great advice. The posture would distract me and I would start working from that direction instead. Tried to to find anything right they were doing and praise them for it for encouragement. I know encouragement from me to my son didn't seem to work as well as encouragement from someone else has. It turned the light on for him and all the things we worked on together has taken shape. I've ordered him an Arban book that should be here this week.
     

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