Worried: Cannot play G

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jerec576, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. jerec576

    jerec576 Pianissimo User

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    So I wake up and go on with my normal practice routine; but today I started my warm up with lip flexibilities (Very Slowly). Did my intense tongue exercises and put the horn down to return 5 minutes later. Curiously enough, my lips would allow me to play anything than the middle range E and G!!!

    The felt fine, responsive at the low register, but I sounded horribly strained on just about anything in the 2nd register (besides C).

    This causes great concern for me as my effective** (Fully Fluent) is an A to the A below high c typically. I put my horn down after some gentle long tones in the lower register and I think i might have pulled or stretched my lips.

    Any comments?
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If it hurts, don't do it.

    It is pretty dumb to do "intense" stuff" at the beginning. It just spoils your whole day.

    Intense stuff belongs at the END, after you have made a lot of beautiful music.

    If you read any of the qualified posts here, we have in print thousands of times "don't beat yourself up". There is a reason why we say that. You can do a search and get the rest of the story.
     
  3. jerec576

    jerec576 Pianissimo User

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    Today was a technical day for me, and the intense part of it was only the tongue exercises (low volume but clear, even articulations), But i guess i stretched my muscles too quickly and such, but it didnt hurt at all. I just couldnt make the note out. Its bizzare.
     
  4. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    If there is no rhyme or reason for the phenomenon, take a break and don't play for a week.
    Your body and mind should reset itself. Sometimes a person will hit a glitch physically and psychologically it will mess with them more than it should.
    If this doesn't work, seek someone that knows what they are doing when it comes to teaching trumpet. Also, give some serious thought to what Rowuk is saying about "intense stuff"
     
  5. jerec576

    jerec576 Pianissimo User

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    Thanks, thats probably what it was to begin with; i guess i panicked and posted here. Perhaps a break from the rougher higher stuff and just solid long tones should be doen for awhile
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    What kind of excuse is that? "Today is a technical day". Do you want to be a trumpet player or a robot? I get excuses like this from my 4th and 5th grade students exactly once.

    You build chops with MUSIC because that is where you will need those skills later. If technical is an expression for "mindless" practice, then we have discovered the whole problem.

    You need tunes EVERY day. They demand prime time, not what is left over. There can be days where you focus on a bit more articulation studies. Play them more softly to keep the efficiency high and not beat yourself up. The same goes for days when you do more advanced slurs to build range. Divide your practice into logical blocks. Take breaks between those blocks.

    A structured approach with MUSIC at the core is the recipe for success.

    If your G on top of the staff is gone, so what? Pull out the Hymnbook and play tunes that don't go that high. Make them BEAUTIFUL. Play the words. If that is too high, play the alto part. Playing low can be relaxing and useful for getting a big sound!
     
  7. jerec576

    jerec576 Pianissimo User

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    I always kept my trumpet/musical studies very seperate! Always has been like such. I can shape my tone, I know everything (or feel that I know what I must do) to put emotion through pages, or through chords. My talent has always lacked my physical ability to keep up with that and thats one concept I intend to master before going on to do musical interpretation.

    But since you put it that way; I would much rather be a Miles Davis than an Allen Vizzuti (with all respect to both)

    P.S. If it's on a page; it's going to be played as written even after a couple tries; I find trouble being able to play what I decide to do while im improvising
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hey man, YOU are the one without a G. Why don't you turn off the transmitter, turn on the receiver and LISTEN to people that know what they are doing.:thumbdown:

    A couple of tonguing exercizes wiped out what little range you had. Do not assume that Miles had no chops and technique - or that he had less than Vizzutti. Spectacular was not Miles calling card.

    So just to clean this thread up:

    You obviously do not know alot about playing the trumpet, you ask a question, get an honest answer and come back with ridiculous (" I know everything (or feel that I know what I must do) to put emotion through pages, or through chords"). Without a solid musical foundation, you have NO IDEA what is possible.:dontknow:

    You don't know anything and are on the best road to keep it that way. Separating technique from music is the best way to get nowhere fast. Dumb arguments get you ignored.:thumbdown:

    Reality check and wakeup call!
     
  9. EdMann

    EdMann Mezzo Forte User

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    I don't like to get in the way of rowuk. It's like whistling Dixie in Times Square on New Years Eve, but to the point, I think that the OP needs the slap that he provides. You say in your original post that you're "fully fluent" (?) from low A to A below high C. Now what about below that! And clearly tonguing is a major problem for you, perhaps endurance, as you indicate.

    In my lessons with everyone from Lew Soloff to Uan Rasey along with my discussions with pros like Wayne Bergeron, I've learned, or RElearned that you MUST have a positive mental image, which you seem to possess, and to use that to your best advantage: play music and make each note as beautiful as you can. Have a reverance for each moment, each note. Once that stops, you stop. We're here to play tunes, not exercises, and even then, play those musically.

    Ed
    Google
     
  10. gtromble

    gtromble Pianissimo User

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    In the past 3 days I was at a jazz camp with Ingrid Jensen, which included a couple of trumpet-specific sessions. She has a whole approach that integrates technical practice with music - I get the impression she never 'just' works on technical things. She also proved to me that adding the musical component can be a key factor in avoiding the practice meltdowns like the original poster had. Keep the focus on the music - rhythmic timing, intonation, hearing intervals, etc - not on banging out technical drills.
     

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