Worrisome Discoloration and DIY Hole Plugging

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by vc44, Dec 29, 2010.

  1. vc44

    vc44 New Friend

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    Oct 5, 2010
    Hi! I have searched and read a number of threads about various trumpet condition maladies. Unfortunately, I'm still not sure what is going on with my instrument. I forced a stuck middle valve tube and it broke off near the valve and didn't come unstuck. I took it to a shop to get it sautered back on. When I got the horn back in March or so of 2010, it had the pictured red and blue discolorations.

    1. My main concern is being able to play this horn long into the future. It has signifigant sentimental value (though I realize that is not displayed through the obvious lack of maintenance). Is this more than a cosmetic problem. Is it dire?

    2. There is apparently a hole in the sauter as the sound is a little buzzy when I use the middle valve. The buzzing goes away if I plug the right spot with my finger. Would it be unwise to plug this pinhole with some epoxy? I do not have the dough for a professional tech and I no longer trust the above mentioned shop with my horn.

    Any guidance will be greatly appreciated.

    --Chris

    Picasa Web Albums - Chris Veazey - Drop Box
     
  2. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    1. Whoever soldered on the slide didn't do a very good clean-up job.

    2. The pink discolouration is from chem cleaning the horn. You can rub that off pretty easily.

    3. The green is verdigris that comes off with chem cleaning. It is probably caused by your hands sweating or the horn not being kept clean on the outside.

    Just get a tech to fill whatever little hole there is in the solder. It shouldn't cost much, and it is a much more stable repair than epoxy. Putting epoxy also makes it way more difficult to do any more repairs on the horn.
    If it really is sentimental, spend a few dollars and get the job done right.
     
  3. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Listen to Brekelefuw. He is a tech and knows his stuff. I agree that this is not an example of a repair done professionally. However, the discoloration should not be a problem. I have had trumpets with worse cases that that and they cleaned right up. Here is a photo of one.
    [​IMG]

    Some Turtle Wax polishing compound from an autoparts store with a soft rag and some rubbing will work wonders. As far as the remaining hole, I concur that epoxy is not the way to go. If there is not another shop around, take it back to where the repair was done and ask them to patch it under warranty. They can hardly do any more damage to it.
     
  4. jbkirby

    jbkirby Forte User

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    For polishing, try to locate a German manufactured polish called "Weenol". I have restored copper lanterns and trumpets and used this to perform final polishing. It is superior to any I have used and leaves a mirror finish.
     
  5. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Just be aware that if you use Weenol, which is a metal polishing compound, it will remove any lacquer that is still present. Its in a whole 'nother class of abrasion from Brasso, for example.
     
  6. jbkirby

    jbkirby Forte User

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    This is absolutely correct, it is a metal polish for un-lacquered metals! If you use it to shine up areas where lacquer is missing, you must be VERY careful!! A heavy hand will be ruinous.
     
  7. vc44

    vc44 New Friend

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    Oct 5, 2010
    Hey, thanks, guys! Great help and advice. It's a relief to know that the issue won't shelf my trumpet too soon.
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    You say it is only a pin hole ... then I might propose a plug of gel crazy glue as would be reversible (removable) with nail polish remover (as also removes most lacquers). Apply with round toothpick while holding slide downward and hold that position of instrument until dry. For safety, I would also remove second valve while doing this procedure.. Otherwise, (and eventually when you've the cash) have a reputable tech correct the problem.
     
  9. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    If you do put cyanacrylate glue to plug up the hole and then decide to get it properly fixed later, TELL THE TECH. When cyanacrylate is heated it releases toxic fumes.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Absolutely, I agree, even when you've reversed such repair yourself with the "nail polish remover" and then flushed it with white vinegar followed immediately by a water soak. Always tell a tech whatever you've done or think has been done.

    I've got one used and now mostly unused trumpet with a stuck second valve slide and all the proper tools to remove it but I'm not doing it because of the risk of causing worse damage that I've not the tools or skills to correct that a professional tech would. I feel a prior attempt to repair the dent in it has misaligned the tubing.
     

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