worst/best places to have dent

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by 9horn, Oct 15, 2010.

  1. 9horn

    9horn Pianissimo User

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    Feb 25, 2009
    New York
    Hi, I have a small 1/4in dent that happened at the bottom of the bell turn. A common spot i'm told. I don't seem to notice any changes in my sound, could be I am not picking up on it from my end. Is this somthing I can live with. Also what do you feel are the bad spots that will certainly change the sound. Thanks:play:
     
  2. treble_forte

    treble_forte Pianissimo User

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    Sep 11, 2007
    N. Ireland
    Repair shops can get that out very easily. I know, I have put a lot of those in horns :(

    My current Selmer has a reasonably decent ding there (it fell off the table!!!! SAD FACE) but it doesn't affect the sound. I am too broke to get this repaired, so there it shall stay! It is just annoying to see!

    Kindly,
    Mike
     
  3. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    Jan 25, 2007
    Canada
    Sure you can live with it. It won't affect your sound and most horn players wear their dents as a mark of pride. It's sort of a marker that you've been through the wars. :-)
     
  4. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    Jun 10, 2008
    Woodlawn, VA
    My gig horn got knocked over on stage a few weeks ago and put a dent in the bottom of the bell bow.... not too bad, but enough to annoy me. I took it to both repair techs here and they said they were so busy with school stuff that it would take them awhile to get to it. I'm talking a couple of weeks! I walked out and am currently looking for somebody else to maintain my horns. I was a bit peeved as I left.
     
  5. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    I thought all horns were made with indentions in the bell bow. :) Think all of mine have at least a dink there. Shouldn't hurt the sound.

    So, how are we getting them dinked there. On the flaired bell I can understand, but the bow?
     
  6. 9horn

    9horn Pianissimo User

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    Feb 25, 2009
    New York
    Mine was kicked off a trumpet stand by my kid running and catching her foot on the stand leg. The bow had the farthest distance to fall to the ground and got wacked afterwhich my kid got wacked. :-o Just kidding:D
     
  7. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    Why would it bother you that someone had already made commitments to other people to work on their horns? Would you want someone to push your instrument's repair back because someone else walked in with an instrument they wanted repaired quickly? I get this sort of thing all the time (I'm an instrument tech) and it bothers me when a customer can't understand that I can't make more hours in the day and I can't hire someone just so that their instrument gets repaired quickly.

    Chances are that if you find a repair tech who isn't busy at this time of year, they're not very good. This has been my busiest fall ever (35 years in the repair business), which is good for business, but it means that I can't fix everybody's horn overnight.
     
  8. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    Jun 10, 2008
    Woodlawn, VA
    It was the attitude that I got from them. One guy snorted and said January for a due date (this was September). It is an hour of work at most.... a dent and then re-solder the brace between the tuning slide and the third valve crook. As a player I don't want somebody to tell me it will take months before I can get my horn back while a beginner who may or may not practice will get it back. A week or so would have been fine, I'm not looking form the guy to drop EVERYTHING to rush my job through.
    Just wanted to clarify.
     
  9. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    In that case, you were justified in your reaction and I, too, would suggest that you find a different set of techs to take your business to. While being busy, I always work my hardest to get repairs such as yours done in a reasonable time (your suggestion of a week or so is certainly very reasonable) while not significantly altering the estimated time of delivery for other instruments.

    Thanks for clarifying -- I really hate repair shops which demonstrate the attitude you ran into. They give the rest of us a bad reputation.
     
  10. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Oct 19, 2008
    Flinders Vic Australia
    It can take some time to build a good relationship with a repairer, I have used the same one for at least 20 years, I have done small jobs for him like making special tooling and providing new belts for his lathe without charge. If I have something that requires only a few minuits work such as a stuck slide he will do it as I wait and not charge.

    Any of my vintage trumpets I put in the queue and usually takes 3-4 weeks. Any problem with my regular playing instruments he will usually do in a week, I am only able to see him on fridays as I live 50 miles from him.

    Regards, Stuart.
     

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