Wow, just wow.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, Mar 25, 2012.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    So far, pretty much everyone has said/written that a more dead room is better for recording. It's just cleaner that way in the recordings. However, my new arrangement is in no way "dead". It's still very lively and even when all the material is in, and it supposedly sounds like what the engineers had in mind, it won't be completely dead sounding.

    A completely dead sounding room (that's another way to go in other situations) has no ambiance at all ....... You'd have to put some back in electronically (like reverb) or it would sound bad. Also a dead room is not good for practicing at all, there's a compromise somewhere (recording studio standards) where it's perfect. Sounds great, easy to hear yourself and others.

    I know what you mean about vaulted ceilings and good sound. My buddy Jonathan has a house he built himself that has a cathedral type ceiling that goes up to a round peak where there's a skylight. That, plus the room being a truly weird shape gives the place a great sound. That would be a good place to record, I assume. But, the good small room that sounds right is reliable, everything sounds the same (ambiance) and will mix easily.

    So far, I only have a guitar based recording from the old bad sounding arrangement. It's on SoundCloud, called "Blue Turtle". It sounds sort of clean, but if you could hear the Master on my machine through the studio headphones, you would hear all that "noise" that muddies it up.


    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2012
  2. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Uhm .... okay. Apologies accepted.


    Turtle
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Before just accepting "common opinion", it could be useful to examine what happens in a studio that could require "dead".

    Most recordings in a studio are not done one instrument at a time. To keep leakage from multiple instruments and microphones down, deader is better.
    In the studio, microphones are placed close to the sound source when possible. In the case of a trumpet, the large diaphragm condenser mikes are from 1-3 feet away. This position does not create a "natural trumpet sound". Heavy equalization and compression are needed to fix this, still, only a commercial sound is possible. Processing the near field trumpet sound needs a bit of experience (and really good equipment) to get any type of result that does not resemble a toy.

    In the case of a practice room, better, more natural acoustics help us play better, they develop the servo circuit of playing (lips vibrate, standing wave of the horn, tactile sensation from vibrating horn, leakage of sound off of the outside of the bell. room reflections return to the ear - this is all processed by the brain and that gives us the clues on modifying our playing which results in the overall impression that our audience gets. The initial sound is autopilot.

    I will argue that it is stupid to practice in a dead room. This is because the servo circuit that I mentioned is responsible for our perceived blow, sound and expression. Just practice outdoors for a week and hear how RAW your sound and attacks get when you are back in a normal room.

    I think that the bass traps and diffusion are FAR superior for the intended purpose here than further damping. The advantages of maintaining the servo outweigh any of the imagined disadvantages.
     
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  4. duanemassey

    duanemassey Piano User

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    Yep, an ideal rehearsal room is rarely an ideal recording environment. And size DOES matter, as a small room is easier to deaden but difficult to enhance, while a large room is just the opposite. One simple method for DIYer's is to construct simple baffles that have one live side (hard reflective surface) and one dead side (sound diffusive). These could be free-standing or attached to walls with hooks. These don't have to be floor to ceiling.
     
  5. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    Congrats Turtle on your acoustic success. Perhaps I missed something, but how do these things work in the sense are they freestanding, attach to your walls etc? Also just curious, but what do you have on your floor?:dontknow:
     
  6. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    The bass traps are intended to be stuck on the wall in the corners, usually up high, where the top of the wall meets the ceiling. You can order either spray adhesive or glue that comes in a tube but either way, according to the instructions, should be considered "permanent". I got mine up with pushpins, so I don't have to worry about any damage if and when I want to take them down. With the cost of these things, I care more about not damaging them than my walls. :lol:

    My floors are (fake) cherry hardwood and he had nothing in the plans to go anywhere on the floor. There are, if I do everything, 6 big plastic diffusers that get stuck up on the ceiling.


    Turtle
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    I think the most relevant thing about this whole thread for trumpet players is that not all practice rooms are alike. Some (like mine WITH the bass traps) are giving the sound, relatively, that's coming out of the horn. And others, like mine BEFORE the bass traps, give back reflections that color the sound hugely. So that, you don't hear anything like the same sound. How are you supposed to develop a better trumpet tone when you don't even hear anything like what you're actually sounding like?


    Turtle
     

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