Wow! You don't have to buzz!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by misty.sj, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. tjcombo

    tjcombo Forte User

    1,000
    749
    Nov 12, 2012
    Melbourne, Australia
    Everyone will of course have their own take, but for me...

    1. Validation - for want of a better word. Learning to play in an era where orthodoxy was that you should be able to buzz your lips meant that in constantly seeking to improve, the lack of a buzz might be a limiting factor. Seems maybe I wasn't too far off the mark and explains why some kids who could buzz real good had trouble playing much above the staff.
    2. Refocusing on airflow, aperture, relaxation etc has worked for me.
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,420
    7,546
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    I'm not sure about the first part as to the OP's real meaning. There are hundreds of videos of players playing clear or cutaway mpc's for the purpose of studying the embouchure. Most all of the ones I've seen show the lips buzzing/vibrating. Some show what happens when the aperture is too big, and in those, the lips weren't buzzing/vibrating and there was no sound produced. I really for the life of me cannot see why someone can't buzz/vibrate your lips. I've read the posts were folks say they can't do it. Early training in some circles involves "horse flapping" the lips. It's as simple as closing ones mouth and blowing air through your lips. It doesn't sound like all that much, but, that is buzzing, although at a very low frequency. Maybe they can't buzz like Maynard (who did buzz) or Bill Chase (who did so to the annoyance of the band on bus trips) and that's were they think they have failed so quit trying. IDK!!?? Maybe if the OP was clear and didn't make the post sound as if some "breakthrough" had been found that negated an integral part of playing brass instruments, it would help clarify things.
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,420
    7,546
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    I think they discovered how to relax while playing.
     
  4. Brad-K

    Brad-K Piano User

    250
    88
    Jun 18, 2011
    I saw that video a year or so ago. Gave it a sincere try. ...Maybe I'm missing the point, but it seems to me more of an exercise that helps align the lips, thus balancing the effort made by each, and also thus helping the focus ad aim of one's wind, and thus one's buzz...you're shooting straight down the pipe, and not bouncing off the sides of the MP....which all is very good. But in the end, you're still buzzing to make the sound. He said the trumpet is a wind instrument, but it's really a vibration/sound instrument, the wind is just the medium/carrier/vibrational activator....And that vibration must be controlled, so yeah...buzzing IS a good thing.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hac7ClgCnN8
     
  5. misty.sj

    misty.sj Forte User

    1,144
    211
    Jan 27, 2008
    Brisbane, Australia
    I definitely CAN buzz on just the lips or the mouthpiece. I have very good control and two octaves of range on the mouthpiece. But I have never been a relaxed "airstream riding" player, and I want to be.
     
  6. ckkphoto

    ckkphoto Pianissimo User

    126
    53
    Jan 31, 2013
    Northwest Georgia
    I really enjoyed these videos. Helped me understand what I was just starting to grasp intuitively about playing relaxed. Even more, it is the first time I ever heard anyone say specifically what they were doing while they played the trumpet. I would probably still listen to anyone else with a competing point of view. I have a LONGGGGGGGG way to go to play the way that I would like to but I think it boils down to a few things. 1. basic good habits without gross poor form. 2. relax and enjoy playing 3. time on the trumpet 4. practice with purpose. I will never be a pro player (but I would like to be able to play baroque music well) but tips like these I found really helpful and encouraging.
     
  7. rockwell

    rockwell Pianissimo User

    246
    46
    Dec 6, 2011
    Much less fatiguing than other embouchures. What sold me that it was valid was that while blowing the air stream through the mouthpiece there is no buzz, but as soon as the lead pipe is put on the mouthpiece (without air stream interuption), there's the sound. An embouchure that produces a buzz through just the mouthpiece takes so much more effort.
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,420
    7,546
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    What is most likely happening, is the pressure from putting the mpc in the receiver is forming your embouchure through pressure being applied. This is what some refer to as a static embouchure. This limits what you can do without using pressure (which works short term, but isn't a long term solution). It's basically a pressure embouchure IMO.
     
  9. tjcombo

    tjcombo Forte User

    1,000
    749
    Nov 12, 2012
    Melbourne, Australia
    Could be pressure (albeit very small), could also be that putting a leadpipe or horn onto the mpc forms a resonant system with a little back pressure that then encourages/allows/enables the lips to vibrate. As the aperture gets smaller and the airstream made faster, the mpc without a leadpipe will start to make noise when put against the lips. Kind of goes along with the resonant system idea.

    BTW, I'm not questioning the goodness of buzzing on an mpc, just sayin' that taking the focus off stand-alone lip buzzing has worked for me.
     
  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,420
    7,546
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    I understand that and think it's a cool video. It's the same as blowing into a stadium horn at a soccer game. All those potential players at a World Cup match and they don't even know it. :D
     

Share This Page