Xeno

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eisprl, Nov 20, 2004.

  1. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

    Age:
    31
    1,329
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    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    Yeah, to each his own. I kind of felt like the Xenos were a bit too plain for my taste. They reminded me of a Bach, without that Bach "Ring."

    Of course, my instructor absolutely rocks with his Xeno! His is a large-bore, with reversed tune slide, amado water key on the third valve slide, and straight water key on his main tune slide. I still think that combination looks cool, lol.

    Van
     
  2. silverstar

    silverstar Mezzo Forte User

    848
    1
    Jan 6, 2005
    I tried out the regular 8335, the 8335RGS, and the 8345.

    I found that the regular horn was nice, but it didn't have anything special about it. The 8345 (large bore) was awesome sounding, very open and everything, but for me I couldn't play it because I don't have that kind of air support. I settled with the RGS and I love it. It sounds great in my Wind Symphony and Jazz band. It's very open and the harmonics are incredible!

    Another horn I would suggest is the Conn Vintage 1B. I almost got that one...

    Lara
     
  3. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

    Age:
    31
    1,329
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    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    Like any horn, it will sound *so* much better if it has been customized. One is because of the better quality materials, but I also think knowing you have one built around you and your personal taste.

    The top horns for anyone to try within the "budget" (i.e. $1000-$1600) level is: Xeno, Vintage 1, B&S Challenger 2, and any used Elkhart Strad before the 90s. An early Elkhart, when found, go for a steal. When I finally give in and join the workforce, I am most definitely adding an Early Elkhart to my collection.

    Lara, have you ever tried a Blackburn pipe with your Xeno?

    Van
     
  4. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    Lara, IMHO, the first step to customization of a new horns is a Precision Valve Alignment and there's no big hurry for that. You might send it to Brass Bow or Reeves while you're on summer vacation. 99% of the time you'll notice a signficant improvement from that.

    Leadpipes, IMHO, are best saved for trumpets with "problems", like a 229C Bach or an Olds Ambassador. Don't get me wrong, they can transform a trumpet, BUT you just went through a long selection process, which included the leadpipe, so why would you change that.

    Dave
     
  5. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

    Age:
    31
    1,329
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    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    Yeah, Dave is right. My opinion on how great Blackburn pipes are could be due to the fact that the Strad I tested the pipes on SUCKED. It did transform that Strad into the best one I've ever played on, though.

    Then again, with the Blackburn pipe, I can't really call the horn a "Strad" anymore, can I? :D

    Van
     
  6. music matters

    music matters Pianissimo User

    219
    1
    Apr 26, 2004
    ON Canada
    I agree that they are fantastic horns - well made and consistent and will blend into any situation. I also agree with the above post as i too have found them a bit dull and lacking in character, but still a great horn and one I would recommend if you like the sound you make on it.

    MM
     

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