YAMAHA XENO, reversed lead pipe

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by azhiba, Sep 12, 2009.

  1. azhiba

    azhiba New Friend

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    My primary instrument is a Yamaha Xeno YTR8335G with a standard (flat) lead pipe. However, I would like to replace it with a reversed (round) lead pipe in order to reduce the air resistance, as I have successfully done with one of my strads, but have been told that there isn't such thing as a reversed (round) lead pipe for a Xeno. Anyone knows whether this is true or not? Many thanks.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    A reversed leadpipe does NOT reduce resistance. It reduces projection and maximum undistorted volume by taking support away from the bell. Players believe that it is more free blowing because the bell takes a chunk of what the audience was getting and radiates it back to the player.

    The sound is not as full. I have experimented at length with this. Just about every brand reacts the same way.

    The Xeno is such a fine horn. I would not take the chance.
     
  3. azhiba

    azhiba New Friend

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    Thanks a lot.
    With my Strad I actually get the feeling that the air resistance is some what being reduced. An impression lots of my colleagues are sharing with me. However, which leadpipe I use isn't crusial to me; I was just thinking that since I experienced a significant improvement with my Strad I would perhaps be able to experience the same thing with my Xeno.
    The Xeno is definitely my favourite trumpet of those I have played at over the years.
     
  4. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Interesting reply, Rowuk. When my son was moving up to a new trumpet 2 years ago, we went to a store which had a lot of different models and makes to try, and the Xeno with the reverse leadpipe (from the factory that way) was the best of the whole bunch. I was standing away from him and he sounded the best on it, and he liked the response and intonation and everything about that horn. When I played it, I liked the way it played the best, even when compared with the same model Xeno with the traditional leadpipe. And standing back and listening from an audience point of view, there was a difference between the two instruments, with the reverse leadpipe sounding the best.

    Now I will readily admit that there is much more to any individual trumpet's sound, projection and playability than merely the leadpipe/tuning-slide configuration, so I can't say that was the cause, but it was the only visible difference between the xeno trumpets he tried.

    I would second Rowuk's advice not to take the chance, if Azhiba really likes his horn as it is currently. There's no knowing in advance whether any change to an instrument will make it better or make it worse from what it is before the change. And once a change has been made, there's no guaranteeing that changing it back again will return it to the same great state it started out in.

    But I wouldn't dismiss the reverse leadpipe as not being good -- just that it isn't good for the way Rowuk plays the trumpet, which is fine. No particular configuration is going to be good for everybody. When I was at ITG back in May, I played some $3000 and up trumpets (some with very unique configurations) which offered me nothing above what I was getting from my 30-year old Besson Brevete model. Yet there were people around me oohing and aahing over how wonderfully those trumpets played and how much better they were than those people's current models.

    But I would use the old repairman's advice (which I use often): "If it ain't broke, don't fix it!"
     
  5. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I have reversed leadpipes on my spada/bach trumpets. I don't experience any problems with projection. Could I have more projection with standard leadpipe? Don't really know (all the leadpipes available at the moment of purchase were reversed), but I am happy with what I got.
     
  6. azhiba

    azhiba New Friend

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    dhbailey... thanks for your comments... well there isn't any risk trying out a reversed leadpipe... I mean if it isn't to my liking I still have the standard one. But of course it will cost me some money.

    Btw, I find it interesting that none of the trumpeters I know who has replaced the standard leadpipe with a reversed ditto has gone back to the standard one.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2009
  7. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    But my point is that you need to change the tuning slide as well, or buy a new leadpipe and a new tuning slide. And then you won't ever be sure if it was simply the new leadpipe and tuning slide which made the change, as opposed to the exact configuration. If you had a new traditional leadpipe and a new traditional tuning slide you might find just as much change (good or bad) in how the instrument plays.

    And if you have your local repairshop change the tuning slide to work with the reverse leadpipe, changing it back again might result in it not being as good as it is now. Any change introduces the potential for harm as well as for good, and there is no guarantee that things will be returned to the exact state they are in originally.
     
  8. TotalEclipse

    TotalEclipse Piano User

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    I think there i some confusion here.....
    To azhiba when you say reversed leadpipe you seem to talk about the shape of the crook.
    Are you meaning changing the crook from a 'D' type to a round type?
    The surgery required to actually 'Reverse' the lead pipe is more than just the shape.
    For a true reversed LP when the slide is out the top leg of the slide a female tube and the lower leg has a male tube as below
    [​IMG]
     
  9. azhiba

    azhiba New Friend

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    Aug 25, 2009
    Hi there,
    That's exactly what I mean - only wanna change the 'crook'/tuning slide. Sorry I wasn't expressing myself clear enough. Shouldn't have called it a 'reversed leadpipe'. Thanks.
     
  10. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Leadpipe and tuning slide is not the same thing. Changing the tuning slide is something that anyone can do on his trumpet. However I doubt that changing the tuning slide only will make a big difference. I have first had standard than round tuning slide on my C trumpet (Spada-Bach 256) but the difference was rather subtle...The hassle was actually more than the obtained result - the round was slightly longer than the standard so Rene Spada had to cut down the length on my leadpipe to keep the same overall pitch. Cutting the leadpipe made the solder of the finger hook weak which fell off few months later. Than I had to get back to get the hook soldered and reinforced again. Felt never since. But it was trouble nevertheless. I don't know if Yamaha round tuning slides are the right length - should be, but if not you can always put back the square one.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2009

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