You Don't Really Know

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tunefultrumpet, Jan 13, 2009.

  1. tunefultrumpet

    tunefultrumpet Pianissimo User

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    Apr 9, 2008
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    This post is to pass on a small relevation and eat some humble pie. I was always skeptical about comments made on TM (most often by Rowuk) that a trumpet player does not really know what they sound like out front. Today I decided to test what I sound like on each of the 10 mouthpieces I own by recording myself with a high quality microphone playing the same extract on each of them. I discovered that a mthpiece I bought for lead playing, which I was reluctant to play in public because it sounded to edgy and thin to my ears, actually had one of the best sounding tones, slightly dark and very rich (Denis Wick 3E, size equivalent to VB2E if there is such a thing). First equal with a slightly mellower but still rich sound was my VB7C.

    Anyway, this proved to me that whether you're testing a mthpiece or a trumpet for sound, what you hear from behind the horn is not what the audience hears. At best, if a room has some reverb, you hear a blend of a little of what they hear with a lot your "behind the horn sound."

    For those interested my 10 pieces were: VB11/2C, 7C, 7CW, 7E, 7EW, Cannonball 3C, Schilke 10B4 and 17D4, DW-MM4C

    It's a really worthwhile exercise to record yourself when testing horns or mouthpieces for tone, or get someone else to listen.
     
  2. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    Can you post your results?
     
  3. tunefultrumpet

    tunefultrumpet Pianissimo User

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    I'll see if I can convert my wav files to mp3's and put them on the web.
     
  4. tunefultrumpet

    tunefultrumpet Pianissimo User

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    Apr 9, 2008
    New Zealand
    Here are my recordings for each mthpiece......scarey, my playing is now exposed. I'm interested to know which you guys would pick out as having the best tone.

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  5. oohhh yeah

    oohhh yeah Pianissimo User

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    Nov 23, 2008
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    Edit: Wait I got it now.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2009
  6. oohhh yeah

    oohhh yeah Pianissimo User

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    Nov 23, 2008
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    To be honest, they all sound the same:dontknow: But nice playing there:thumbsup:
     
  7. FlugelNoob

    FlugelNoob Pianissimo User

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    Jan 5, 2009
    Toa Payoh, Singapore
    I have also heard that what trumpeters hear are different from what the others hear. And I did the same and I sounded really different.

    oohhh yeah, you should pay very close attention to the tone and sound quality, maybe then you can hear the difference?
     
  8. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    I liked 4 & 6

    Can you try something that will show off the upper range that you bought the "lead" piece for?

    Those were all nice though.
     
  9. tunefultrumpet

    tunefultrumpet Pianissimo User

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    will do, have to wait till tomorrow as I don't want to disturb the neighbours this late.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Tunefultrumpet,
    great samples!

    It actually gets worse: in a small room like many of us practice in, the reflected sound off of the hard walls teaches us to play "stuffy". When playing outdoors, the freedom of reflections robs our ear/brain of useful clues about our sound, dynamics, projection and the like. Only in that "concert hall setting" do we gain the experience of the way it REALLY is supposed to work. Those that get more opportunities in good rooms, get better sounding faster.

    Lightweight trumpets "lose" more energy through the bell and give the player more feedback - at the cost of less for the audience. Heavy trumpets focus more energy to the audience but if the player is not REALLY familiar with the horn, they are playing on autopilot with NO IDEA of what they are doing.

    This is an important concept when looking for a new horn. You really need to get into the type of acoustic space that you perform in AND have a second set of ears that you can trust! The music store environment offers no indication what you will have in real life!
     

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