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Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Matthew Cruice, Sep 19, 2015.

  1. JRgroove

    JRgroove Mezzo Piano User

    Age:
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    Apr 8, 2014
    Kansas City
    You only need to get the same horn the OP is playing. :duh:
     
  2. JRgroove

    JRgroove Mezzo Piano User

    Age:
    54
    549
    314
    Apr 8, 2014
    Kansas City
    Dang :stars:
    I'm wore out from reading all those techie posts. :shock:
    Now I need nap :zzz:
     
  3. Matthew Cruice

    Matthew Cruice New Friend

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    Sep 13, 2015
    Rufflicks, oh my word! You've got some ears! I really had to listen to pick up on some of the spots you mentioned. To be quite honest, before I post a video, I typically can hear most stuff that is not right. Fuzzy attacks, intonation that is not quite perfect, etc. I just really try to not get bogged down in redoing things (probably a bad thing). I think I may need to try that Arban's exercise. Nowadays I warm-up on flow studies, and then jump right into whatever my next youtube project is. But yea, I do need to hear notes better. I think sometimes I rely on head knowledge too much. I know that an A in the staff is going to run sharp, and I play around with the first valve slide without truly hearing where the note is.

    I may need to learn how to start using click tracks. For my multitracks, I have the original soundtrack song playing under me the whole time. It helps me (for the most part) to stay in time, and I feed off it musically as well. Once all the parts are in, I simply just take out the soundtrack. Oh, and I would love to say that I did all the JP videos in one take, but alas, it isn't true. I try to not turn pages of music on camera, so sometimes I divide up videos to take that into account, and other times I simply need all the energy I can muster for certain sections. The original songs has all these different melodies divided up among different instrumental sections, or just give them to the strings who can play all day without stopping, so it just isn't practical for me to blow through entire songs in one shot. Right now I'm working on a multitrack of "Drink Up Me Hearties: Yo Ho" from "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End" and there is no way I can go from a majestic, loud, accented section straight into the "He's a Pirate" theme with only an 8th note rest in between :lol:

    Thanks for the advice overall! As much as I don't like to hear criticism, I need to hear it. On one of my videos that I didn't particularly like, I got a notification that there was a new comment: it started out "to be honest..." and I thought I was finally going to have someone tell it like it is, but then the rest of the comment was "you are one of the best trumpet players out there." ROFL
     
  4. rufflicks

    rufflicks Pianissimo User

    169
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    Dec 9, 2009
    Nor Cal
    Matthew,
    First, thank you for the compliment on my ears several people I know think they are too big including my wife.

    I truly think as an exercise, and not necessarily something you post, you should do a project that you critically analyze and re-track anything that is questionable. It will make you a better producer and player. It will also get your ears going. You will learn a great deal from this process.

    If you learn what is wrong and how to correct it you are developing a skill that could be parlayed into producing other peoples projects. Great ears and an understanding of how to put things together to form a great product are skills that will serve you well.

    Practicing basics is never the “fun” part of playing but if you take it as a challenge to be perfect while doing it you will become a better player. Always keep a balance between developing skills and applying them. I love what you are doing it is fantastic.

    Developing your own music is key in today’s music scene. Innovating things that exist is absolutely a great way to do this. Becoming better and better will open possibilities in the future. Consider that it is easy for musicians in different parts of the world to share sound files to collaborate and create a project in their own studio at home…endless possibilities are available.

    Keep working on it you will get this down.

    Best,

    Jon
     

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