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Trumpet Discussion Discuss How is increase my range...the RIGHT way? in the General forums; I started working on a new tune that, and to do this right I need to increase my practical (i.e. ...
  1. #1
    Pianissimo User rdt1959's Avatar
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    How is increase my range...the RIGHT way?

    I started working on a new tune that, and to do this right I need to increase my practical (i.e. musical) range by about two steps.

    My current musical range is D above the staff. I can play that musically every time I pick up the horn.

    <insert sound of thunder as lightning stikes the nose that just grew 3 inches>

    OK...OK...I can USUALLY play the D muscially. I can hit and hold and E if ...and only if...I play it LOUDLY. But the new tune goes up to F. And at that point the trumpet part is the background for the vocalists, so I new to play is softly (i.e. musically).

    I am working on this song for my own satisfaction, with no performance of it scheduled or even on the horizon. It is just a beutiful song that I have fallen in love with. So I am in no need of quick results, and I am willing to take the time and make the effort to get my range up to F...and KEEP my range up to F.

    Under these circumstances, does anybody have some exercises that they have used successfully to increase their range a little bit? Again, I am not looking for a quick fix.

    Thanks.
    Dick Taylor
    Georgia
    Comeback Player
    Benge 65B

  2. #2
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    For me range is all in the warm-up. This is a warm-up and practice routine that was given to me by Mark Hughes and it works well for me.

    On C trumpet:

    Start with a G in the staff and buzz a scale (major, minor, chromatic, whatever) down to the low G then back up.

    Then play the arpeggio down the up.

    Play down scale wise to Low G then down to pedal G and back up, then play the 2 octave arpeggio.

    Next start in the staff between G and C and buzz a one octave scale or arpeggio ascending. Move up in half steps, whole steps or 3rds (whatever depending on time), until you buzz all the way up to the limit of your range. Coming down from the scale is the most important part so don’t forget that. Also, practice starting on the highest note and coming down.

    Buzz one melody or song by ear.

    Flow studies by Vincent Cichowicz page 2 descend by ½ steps, also page 3 if time

    Clarke technique studies for the cornet. Studies 2 to 5 ( do a few from each study everyday). If you want more detail on this part PM me, it is pretty involved.

    This will take you some time to do everyday, but it works for me.

  3. #3
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    I have three suggestions, I use all of them.

    1) Clarke-Take up an octave

    2) 2 octave chromatic scales. Start on low f sharp, and go up to f sharp on the staff, then back down. Then got to G...and so on, all the way up to where you want to stop, I've gotten to about a Dbl A.

    3)Maggio Method. You can't find it in any stores, so you have to find it online, Just search for it, and you'll run across it.


    I have also heard good things about Jerry Callet's superchops method. I have never personally used it, but that is also an option.

    Hope I was of some help


    Jon
    Jonathan Wright

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    There are quite a few, good exercise books out there. Buuut, the problem is that what you need for the high register is tough to learn from a book. You have to narrow the aperature of your lips, increase your air speed and learn to control the air speed. I'd recommend finding a good trumpet teacher. I'm a comebacker as well and finding a good trumpet teacher made a big difference for me. If you can't do that---well, the exercises that my trumpet teacher had me do were:

    1. Low notes---in Arbans there are some exercises, I also just did a lot of whole notes held for as long as I could. There is something about playing low that affects playing high.

    2. Lip slurs---also called 'flexibility studies'.....especially when done with intervals conditions the lip for the higher register.

    3. Playing up at the top of your range for short periods of time. Clarks Progressive Etudes or Advanced Etudes, also Claude Gordons 'Systematic Approach to Daily Practice'---where every day you are working up to your highest notes.

    Really, it just takes a lot of time. In high school, my best was about a 'G' at the top of the staff. Many years later, as a comebacker, my best was still a 'G' until I really started focusing on going higher. It took about two years to really start seeing an inrease in range where I 'owned' the note. Now, I'm up to a high C and am working on my endurance level up there. I'm also working on going higher---my best so far is 'E' above High C, and I'm working on making that a useable note. I know it's going to take time but I know it's worth working for.

    Good Luck!
    Bill
    Gabriel is NOT a woodwind player!

  5. #5
    Forte User Heavens2kadonka's Avatar
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    Could I ask what is the piece you're in love with?

    Rdt, is it kind of like after you hit a certain point, the sound cuts off altogether, or does it sound like chipmunk trumpet *It sounds high, but you know it really isn't*?

    I have hit a third octave F only about three times, but I am really practicing on the Clarke advanced (Ninth study is BWEH!), so maybe I can start owning the F (But probably not, heh).

    I have been meaning to try doing what an old trumpet player told me he did to improve his range. He would start on the very last note he could hit comfortably, and hold it at a comfortable dynamic. He would then slowly increase the dynamic, until he was at forte to fortissimo, and then he would go up a half step, decresendoing then. He would do that until he could hit that increment change consistantly, and then could hit that note without hitting the prior note. He would then do the same exercise, starting on the new comfort note to him.

  6. #6
    Forte User Heavens2kadonka's Avatar
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    High octave chromatic workings are also very good for development, but be sure not to forget the low range. I think we all know the trumpet player who could scream but had a tone like he was farting through the horn? Whats the purpose of playing a trumpet blindingly fast and screechy if it doesn't sound good?

    EVEN MORE EVIL: A trumpet player who plays like that and thinks everyone sucks unless they play high, screechy and bad too!

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    Pianissimo User rdt1959's Avatar
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    Heavens;

    The song I was working on is a David Oneill arrangement of "Shout to the Lord"
    Dick Taylor
    Georgia
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    Benge 65B

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    Pianissimo User rdt1959's Avatar
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    Thank you ya'all

    First, thanks to all for your replies and advice. I apologize for being a bit slow with my responses. I was on vacation last week and really didn't even check my e-mail but once or maybe twice.

    One of the highlights of my vacation was a very enlightening 2 + hours spent with Dizforprez last Wednesday. Within the first 10 minutes he had me convinced that I have more fundamental issues to work on than just increasing my range a note or two!

    So the song, and the range issue, is going to have to wait for a while until I get the fundamentals under control. By the time I master all the stuff that diz gave me, I am positive that there won't be a range issue!

    Now, vacation is over. And it's back to work in my never ending endeavor to prove, one and for all (at the goverment's expense of course) that water flows down hill!
    Dick Taylor
    Georgia
    Comeback Player
    Benge 65B

  9. #9
    Forte User Heavens2kadonka's Avatar
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    Don't feel too bad. I've basically disappeared off of the Earth these past few days (I've still got to finish that e-mail to Jinbao post...).

    What did diz give you to work on? What are the fundamentals you are speaking of (I'm a curious little fellow, aren't I?)

  10. #10
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    Ahhh, now the light dawns. I just played Davids' arrangement of the 'Star Spangled Banner' and 'Battle Hymn/Exodus Medley' for the July 4th service at church. I really like Davids' arrangements and backing tracks but you had better own the high C and everything under it !

    BTW, in talking to Wendy at Davids' Brass Trax business, she said that they are going to come out with some arrangements that are pitched lower so folks that don't have such a high register can have something interesting to play.

    Keep working and the notes will come!

    Bill
    Gabriel is NOT a woodwind player!

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