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Trumpet Discussion Discuss Stage Fright Article in Instrumentalist in the General forums; The Instrumentalist has a good article on stage fright in this month's June 2004 issue by Michael Goode that may ...
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    Stage Fright Article in Instrumentalist

    The Instrumentalist has a good article on stage fright in this month's June 2004 issue by Michael Goode that may be good for your students and others.

    Go to: www.trumpetworkspress.com and click on "In the Press" tab

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    Forte User MUSICandCHARACTER's Avatar
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    Ten posts. 9 have been about your book ... well at least telling us to buy your book. If you tell me I am angry and therefore I should read your book, rethink the response. I have a psychology doctorate. (You have said that several time to others who accused you of "spamming".)

    I don't know if you are Michael Goode or not. Probably. I have a suggestion for you. Help us. Teach us. Don't just sell to us. If your answer wasn't always "buy this book" maybe someone would.

    If you participated on this board more than trying to sell (OK, you had one post asking for a C pocket trumpet) you would probably gain some friends and people would WANT to buy your book. I have it listed on my website bookstore -- for now. But the only thing you contribute is about you. A board is about everyone helping others. Sometimes selling something to someone IS helping others. But if that is all you have to offer -- well, it is boring and wearing thin.

    Jim
    Dr. Jim Fox
    Licensed Mental Health Therapist
    Owner: www.allbrassradio.com

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    This guy Spams the Trumpet Herald website even worse. If you want info on performing your best under pressure check out the books by....

    Don Greene

    He is the authority on this subject!

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    Instrumentalist Article on Stage Fright

    To Dr. Fox and orchtpt,

    I am sorry that you are wasting an inordinate amount of time, energy and hostility towards the posts about my book that were done on this website in good faith and with the full permission of the website administrator. My book has heloed hundreds of people including many principals of major orchestras and their students. If no one knows about the book, then they cannot benefit from its content.

    Don Greene is a dear friend of mine and we are going to do a clinic together in the fall.

    If you wish to see real spam, I would suggest that there are many places on the web you may leave your contact information so that you could receive it.

    Sincerely,

    Michael Goode
    Author
    Stage Fright in Music Performance and Its Relationship to the Unconscious
    Assistant Principal/Third Trumpet
    Ravinia Festival Orchestra
    University of Chicago, M.L.A.
    www.trumpetworkspress.com

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    Forte User MUSICandCHARACTER's Avatar
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    Michael Goode said:

    I am sorry that you are wasting an inordinate amount of time, energy and hostility towards the posts about my book that were done on this website in good faith and with the full permission of the website administrator. My book has heloed hundreds of people including many principals of major orchestras and their students. If no one knows about the book, then they cannot benefit from its content.
    Amazing. Hostility? How about a polite suggestion. Inordinate? Since when was a few minutes to make a post an "inordinate" amount of time or energy? If your book has as much hyperbole as your post it would be worthless. My guess is it doesn't. I don't doubt your book has helped others. Have you for free?

    My point, and I'll make it again since it didn't seem to get to you the first time. Contribute to the board. Make friends. Help some people without them having to buy your book. You might actually sell more. I never said the administrator was against this. You inferred what I never implied.

    Give us some snippets of your book. Answer questions. Offer free autographed copies for the best question. Anything more than just the sales pitch. A constant stream of sales pitches seems like spam. You may think that only email is spam, and I would guess according to the "Can-Spam" law you would be correct. But posts that only sell feel like spam.

    This isn't hostility. You have to post about ZeuS to get hostility :wink:

    Suggestions. If you have the time to respond to us and accuse us of hostile actions, you have the time to contribute. What is in your unconscious if you feel like this was hostile?

    Now I have not read your book. Perhaps you could share a suggestion or two from it to entice us? If you cannot contribute more than a sales pitch, you are annoying people and wasting bandwidth and time.

    My opinion only. I am not important enough to worry about when it comes to opinions. Please the critics and the symphony members. I direct a community band and I am a Minister of Music part-time. I make my living as a mental health therapist. My opinion matters very little.

    But some three hundred posts later, I have done some selling. But I hope that by and far, I have contributed. My greatest "gift" to the trumpet community is my mouthpiece chart. Hundreds of hours of work. I give it away a couple hundred times a week.

    Furthermore, I have met very few of the people on this board face to face. But yet, I would consider many of them my friends. Even the ones who have disagreed with me in polite debate. I would again suggest politely, that if you contributed you would make not only a few friends, but more sales than you would with the occasional sales pitch.

    All I suggested was that you contribute more than a sales pitch. Take it for what it is worth -- free advice.

    Jim
    Dr. Jim Fox
    Licensed Mental Health Therapist
    Owner: www.allbrassradio.com

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    Stage Fright Article in Instrumentalist

    Dear Dr. Fox,

    Thanks for responding even though I don't agree with everything you have said. But that is what forums like these are for, to be able to express differing points of view and to somewhere come to a consensus on issues.

    Many people have asked me about this book and are buying and talking about it, so I am posting some of the basic information about it here. It covers issues of stage fright and playing, mental states while playing, and talks about Herseth, Jacobs, and Scarlett, and why they have no stage fright when they play. It also covers some of the problems in the orchestral world today, including the use of Inderal.

    As I have mentioned before, the mental aspect is the fundamental in itself, that makes all the fundamentals of playing easy. I got this from Arnold Jacobs who used to say this all the time, and from Bud Herseth, who does it all the time, and the same for Will Scarlett. All these men are my teachers.

    The book has been featured on the BBC's radio show "Music Review" and there is an interview with the author. For more details see below or see www.trumpetworkspress.com and click on the "appearances" tab to hear the actual interview.

    The book has highly detailed descriptions of stage frigjht from a physical, psychological, and musical point of view.

    There is also an appendix that talks about how to combat hyperventilation in trumpet-playing.

    I do consultations based on the book. A person who had serious stage fright problems worked with me and then won an audition with a major symphony. A number of others with severe stage fright have made dramatic improvements. One of my professional jazz students who has a very heavy playing schedule, has increased his endurance by 200%. Another one of my pro students who was having serious chop problems, read the book had consults with me, and won an award as the best salsa trumpet player in the country last year. A pro player who I have also helped because of the book can now get a much bigger orchestral sound that he can use on the job. And the book has helped hundreds of my younger students who have read it and were inspred by it.

    Chapter 1 gives an overview of the book, definitions of the terms used, medical descriptions of stage fright, and talks about the solutions that have been out there up to this point.

    Chaper 2 takes the hundreds of case histories of people I observed and blends them into four different composites. three instrumentalists, (two brass players, one woodwind), and an operatic singer. It follows their entire careers from childhood to adulthood and as professional performers. The chapter goes through all the stuff that happens in school bands and orchestras, in high school and college, and even touches on military band situations. This chapter talks about the medical and psycholgical factors affecting the playing and singing of the composite characters throughout their careers and what is happening to their playing or singing at every step of their career.

    Chapter 3 talks about the traditional solutions to stage fright that have been around for a long time. It also discuss and comments on the use of the prescription drug Inderal, and its use by some musicians as an attempt to combat stage fright. And finally, in this chapter, there is a detailed discussion and analysis of a scientific study done on the effects of stage fright on the quality of musical performance done by some university researchers. The book discusses the conclusions of this study based on the author's experience of playing with members of the Chicago Symphony in the Ravinia Fesitival Orchestra and from observations and things he has learned from watching his teachers from the CSO.

    There is then a discussion at the end of the chapter of those who have severe stage fright and what their situation is and describes their dilemma from a medical, psychological, and musical standpoint.

    Chapter 4 proposes new solutions to stage fright and describes why Bud Herseth, Arnold Jacobs, and Will Scarlett don't have any when they play and describes what their attitude is when they play and why this works on a scientific basis as well as sounding great at the highest level of musical artistry.

    The rest of chaper 4 contains suggestions on how to overcome stage fright and disusses what the great tenor Enrico Caruso had to overcome from his childhood in order to have a hugely successful musical career.

    Chapter 5 revisits the case histories of the same performers from Chapter 4 and examines how their careers have ended up at this point.

    Chapter 6 reviews why a performer with severe stage fright can not use traditional solutions to overcome it and play well. It also descirbes the disastrous effect of the tranquilizing drug Inderal on musical and artistic quality and comments on how the use of this drug is taking all the excitement away from the classical music business. There is a discussion of the trap of focusing strictly on playing by feel, instead of by artistry. A description is given of how a performer can correct the problem of severe stage fright, and go on to have a successful career. Finally, there is a discussion of the role of talent, natural ability, and genetics and their impact on a musical career as well as a reiteration of the negative effects of the use of the tranquilzing drug Inderal for stage fright.

    Lastly, the chapter ends by discussing why the euphoric, trance-like, Zen-like state that great players like Bud Herseth, Arnold Jacobs, and William Scarlett are in when they play leads to unparalleled artistry and music-making at the highest levels and the value of such an ability to transcend and perform in this state from a spiritual perspective and why this is a good thing for everyone.

    The first appendix deals with the inadequacy and difficulty of analyzing audition tapes, the second appendix is longer and talks about hyperventilation in trumpet playing and how to solve it based on the theories of Arnold Jacobs.

    At the end there is a glossary of all the terms in the book, a bibliography, and an index.

    As far as current popularity goes, just a rough estimate from the publisher, I think that some 1100 people have read the book and purchased it that I am aware of as of this moment. The number is growing by the minute. The BBC show that featured the book is called "Music Review" hosted by Mark Lowther on the BBC World Service. The show runs for one half-hour and the book's interview section is about 15 minutes. The show does have an excerpt of Bud Herseth playing the Mahler 5 which is a nice touch. The BBC World Service Radio audience is 150 million listeners per week according to the interim BBC Director.The book is also featured in an article in the June issue of the Instrumentalist which is also avaiable on the web site. For more info and to hear the interview and read the article see www.trumpetworkspress.com

    Sincerely,

    Michael I. Goode
    Author
    Stage Fright in Music Performance and Its Relationship to the Unconscious
    Assistant Principal/Third Trumpet
    Ravinia Festival Orchestra
    University of Chicago, M.L.A.
    www.trumpetworkspress.com



    ** ** *

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    I like cheeseburgers....


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    Forte User Heavens2kadonka's Avatar
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    But seriously, I had a horrible stage fright problem from my first piano solo until last year. Maybe I just got tired of being scared, or maybe my mind matured past such senseless fears. Who knows? The most nerve racking thing I've ever done in my life was scholarship auditions, and I was solid as a rock!

    Hmmm, maybe it's just I can't play very well if I can't see the judges face (Always made high chairs in festivals and other contests where I could see the judge's face, but I never could make all-regional band, where I couldn't see who I was playing to in the auditions...)...

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