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Trumpet Discussion Discuss What goes into a new horn buying decision? in the General forums; I was asked this recently by a parent about the aspiring student. It is an easier question to answer for ...
  1. #1
    Forte User MUSICandCHARACTER's Avatar
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    What goes into a new horn buying decision?

    I was asked this recently by a parent about the aspiring student. It is an easier question to answer for an up and coming student.

    But what drives an established player to consider a new horn?

    Here are some thoughts I had (meager as they may be):

    • Your favorite horn is just wore out (plating gone from the valves, etc.)
      Your playing needs change (gone from legit to jazz, etc.)
      You need to play in a different style (i.e. a Flugelhorn)
      You're comfortable with your horn, but wow, those new horns have something you want to try.
      You are a tech head -- you like to buy new stuff.


    Any thoughts beyond these?

    M&C
    Dr. Jim Fox
    Licensed Mental Health Therapist
    Owner: www.allbrassradio.com

  2. #2
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    It's a grand old horn that doesn't deserve to die----so, you have it restored.

    You have a death wish and a wife who can grant it!?

    Bill
    Gabriel is NOT a woodwind player!

  3. #3
    Piano User
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    It's a grand old horn that doesn't deserve to die----so, you have it restored.

    You have a death wish and a wife who can grant it!?

    Bill
    Gabriel is NOT a woodwind player!

  4. #4
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    Experience can be a factor. The more horns I play the more I learn about which characteristics I like and don't like.
    Dave M.
    Richmond Hill (Toronto), Ontario, CANADA

    Kanstul WB1600
    1952 L.A. Olds Recording, 1975 L.A. Benge 3x, Yamaha 631 Flugel, Olds Flugel

    GR 65.6 Mouthpieces

  5. #5
    Forte User musicalmason's Avatar
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    I think another one that I think we all know is the truth, is simply, trumpeters are ego-maniacs who just like having the best and being the best out of everybody else around them. Every trumpet player loves to have the best horn in the bunch.
    Bach strad 180s ML 37 melk 525, mk sterling semi round slide
    Curry 60m
    blessing anniversary flugel curry 3fl
    www.AlsMusicShopNY.com
    Al's Music Shop
    Specializing in unique and hard to find instruments.
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/TrumpetsForSale/

  6. #6
    Pianissimo User
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    I agree with Dave M,

    The more horns you have a chance to play, the more your taste may change (regarding equipment choices/availability).

    I have had the opportunity to play "most" of the popular new and vintage horns in the last couple of months. Some of the ones which have been "raved" about I was not particularily impressed with. Others which are occasionally "overlooked" I would have purchased (if I was in the market for a different horn).

    From player to player, the sound (tone) and intonation will remain fairly consistent on a particular horn. After that, everyone will have differing opinions as to blow, response, etc.

    The bottom line...most horns will work for "somebody", while a few will rarely work for "anybody". The horn must be matched to the player.

    Be well.
    PAUL NELSON - Eclipse White Lightning / Getzen Eterna 900 Classic

  7. #7
    Fortissimo User
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    I upgraded for one reason: intonation. I'd been playing a Bach 180 ML37S that was in perfect condition. (both cosmetically and mechanically) After a few months with our senior level band I felt that I might be having intonation problems (never noticed them with the intermediate band). I got one of my kids to sit with a tuner positioned so that I couldn't see it, and I ran some chromatices while they noted how sharp or flat the horn was on each note. I did this with three different mouthpieces (DW 4, Bach 3, Laskey 50B). The horn was all over the map! Consistently and regarless of which mouthpiece was being used.

    That convinced me that I was being "held back" by the horn. Could I have learned to play in tune on it? Yes, most probably. Did I want to take the extra time to learn to play in tune on it? No. Thus the search for (and ultimate purchase of) a horn with MUCH more accurate intonation. From the day I purchased the Schilke I never once played the Bach again; not out of snobbishness... but the difference in the "blow" was so different between the two that I was AFRAID to even try the Bach.

  8. #8
    Forte User MUSICandCHARACTER's Avatar
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    Tootsall said

    I got one of my kids to sit with a tuner positioned so that I couldn't see it, and I ran some chromatices while they noted how sharp or flat the horn was on each note. I did this with three different mouthpieces (DW 4, Bach 3, Laskey 50B). The horn was all over the map! Consistently and regarless of which mouthpiece was being used.


    I had a very similar problem with my mouthpiece which had nothing to do with the horn (my old Benge). My favorite mouthpiece (for comfort and range) was giving me problems -- but I didn't know exactly what the problem was until I got the tuner out. The intonation bounced everywhere. Then I got out some standard mouthpieces and boom, intonation centered with little effort.

    I think everyone should try a horn with several mouthpieces and a tuner or a buddy to listen. Sometimes we overlook (under-hear?) intonation in favor of ease of playing.

    M&C
    Dr. Jim Fox
    Licensed Mental Health Therapist
    Owner: www.allbrassradio.com

  9. #9
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    Expanded on what was already said plus a couple:

    You currently own a student horn which is usually designed more for ease of production of sound rather than intonation.

    Ditto if you have an intermediate horn.

    Ergonomic reasons.

    Your current professional horns sound or blow cannot be altered enough by change sound concepts or via a mouthpiece change or alteration.

    A backup horn is needed.

    Funny ones:

    You just hit the lotto.

    You just got a tax refund.

    You needed to put something on your wedding, birthday or Christmas list.

    Your case needs to be replaced

    There is a new version of yours with a nicer looking brace or some other minor modification.

    Because it’s January

    Because it’s February

    Because it’s some particular month

    Because it is Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday or Sunday.

    You needed a horn to replace yours while yours was out for an ultrasonic cleaning.

    Your valves needed new felts.

    You don’t want to clean your current one.

  10. #10
    Forte User MUSICandCHARACTER's Avatar
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    Hey,

    How often does February 29th fall on a Sunday (so that there are 5 Sundays in Feb)? How about buy a new trumpet because it is leap day? Place your order now, operators standing by ....

    M&C
    Dr. Jim Fox
    Licensed Mental Health Therapist
    Owner: www.allbrassradio.com

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